Search Results for 'Galway City Museum'

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The end of the old Claddagh

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In 1812, there were 468 cabins or houses, all thatched, in The Claddagh. These were occupied by 50 families, totalling 1,050 males and 1,286 females. That was a lot of people and houses in a relatively small geographical area and could be described as a “clachan”, a large irregular group of houses clustered closely together. All of these houses were single storey buildings, only the two-storeyed Aran View House and the early 19th century coastguard houses were higher.

Life on the Aran Islands in the sixties

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WHEN THE late photographer Bill Doyle first visited the Aran Islands in 1964 and began to photograph the local people, he was capturing a way of life that has since vanished.

Seamount Nursing Home

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A “to let” advertisement in a Galway newspaper in April 1860 promoted the fact that Seamount Villa contained a parlour, drawing room, six bedrooms, a kitchen, water closet, a coach house with some stabling, and a small garden. The grounds were nicely laid out and had an approach to the sea. George Fallon who lived at ‘The Baths’, Salthill, would show the place to prospective customers.

Galway Arts Centre - what's going on for 2018

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THE GALWAY Arts Centre's 2018 visual art programme will feature a mix of Irish and international artists and partnerships with several festivals, including the Cúirt international Festival of Literature, TULCA Festival of Visual Art, Baboró International Arts Festival for Children, and Galway International Arts Festival.

Cherishing all the children equally?

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Back in the 1960s my late mother had a two-door Morris Mini-Minor. The mini, about the size of a dog-kennel on wheels, was our family car for years (dad drove a van used for deliveries). I think the mini won the Monte Carlo Rally at one time and it became famous. Towards the end of the decade it actually became cool to have a Mini-Minor after the film The Italian Job, starring Michael Caine. But my brother and I had long legs, and the car became a torture chamber on long journeys. We hated the car. There was little room for us and later for my sister, and all her stuff, the dog (who went ballistic if he saw another dog on the street), the weekly shopping, and all the detritus that family cars gather.

Young Travellers successfully take over Galway City Museum

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Last Friday, Galway City Museum was successfully taken over by a group of young Travellers from Galway City for Takeover Day 2017. This was the second year the museum has been involved in Takeover Day, a Kids in Museums initiative that celebrates young people’s contributions to museums, galleries, heritage sites and other cultural venues. It’s a day on which young people are given meaningful roles, working alongside staff and volunteers to participate in the life of the museum.

Pádraic Ó Conaire: man and monument

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On October 6 1928, writer, journalist, teacher, and raconteur Pádraic Ó Conaire died in tragic poverty in Richmond Hospital, Dublin, at the age of 46. Since the turn of the century he had established himself as one of the leading lights of the Gaelic Revival, an innovative writer who pioneered the short story in Irish.

'We want to highlight the incredible richness of the city and its hinterland'

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Today, Thursday November 9, the Galway City Museum officially celebrates its 10th anniversary and, by any measure it has been a decade of success. Annual visitor numbers have risen from 16,000 in its first year to 216,000 last year. The museum has received TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for five years running and it meets all 34 requirements in the Heritage Council’s rigorous Museums Standards Programme.

Galway Grammar School, 1903

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Galway Grammar School was a Protestant institution established under the Erasmus Smith Trust in 1669. It opened around 1675 and has been located at College Road since 1815. The 1950/51 school year was an eventful one when, in November of that year, a wing of the school was gutted by fire, happily, there was no danger of loss of life. Four months later a dormitory ceiling collapsed. The headmaster, George Coughlan, said that the collapse was caused by a 24 foot beam being charred through by a chimney fire. The beam brought down two other beams and half the ceiling. In many old buildings, beams went into chimney flues and successive chimney fires charred them until they came down. Neither incident occasioned an interruption in the school routine.

Galway City Museum turns ten and it has cake

Galway City Museum is 10 years old and proud to celebrate a decade of success since officially opening in 2007. Building on the work of the previous museum in Comerford House which opened in the 1970s, the current building was established by Galway City Council to further safeguard and promote the cultural heritage of Galway.

 

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