Search Results for 'Collins Press'

8 results found.

St Patrick’s NS, a bird’s eye view, 1959

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This photograph was published on March 13 1959 by Alexander ‘Monkey’ Morgan (1919-1958), a wartime pilot for the Royal Artillery Air Corps, who launched a peacetime career in aerial photography before his tragic death in a plane crash. It is a detail from one of the images he took for the Irish Independent between 1951 and 1958. Some 200 of these have now been published in book form under the title Ireland from the Air. The book is a crystal ball into the past. The images are of such high quality that the detail just leaps out. Our image today is just a section of one of the photographs which we have enlarged.

John Spillane - Nocturne #7

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JOHN SPILLANE is a busy man. In September he launched a new TG4 series; last month saw him publish his first book, Will We Be Brilliant Or What?, a collection of lyrics and memoir; and this month he plays Galway.

Gordon D’Arcy to launch new book in Galway

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THE BREATHING Burren, the new book by environmental writer, artist, and educator, Gordan D’Arcy, will be launched in Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop, tomorrow at 6.30pm.

‘When the heart is yearning it speaks volumes’

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Few can resist the seductive charms of a love song and down the ages Ireland has proffered its share of heart-beguiling airs. Galway author Gerry Hanberry has now taken 15 famous Irish love songs and tells the story of the women who inspired them, in his new book, On Raglan Road, published by Collins Press.

Did Capt John Wilson ever receive his well earned plate?

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There can be no greater horror for passengers and crew than facing death on a burning ship in a heavy sea, that was sinking by its bow. Which death would you choose? Stay on board and be burnt? Or chance your luck in the waves?

The loss of the PS Connaught, flagship of the Galway Line

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The loss of the PS Connaught, October 8 1860, launched to reverse the sliding fortunes of the J Orwell Lever’s Galway Line, was a severe blow to the company. Although the local press tried to make the most of the fact that of the 591 people on board, not one life was lost, the bad publicity soured the public towards the Galway Line, which was also in financial trouble.

Public lecture on Galway city and the 1916 Rising

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OUTSIDE OF Dublin, Galway saw the most significant action of the 1916 Rising, but this took place in the county. Galway city by contrast was hostile to the rebellion and firmly supported the British.

‘What the hell is going on?’

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‘What the hell is going on?’ appears to be what the British Prime Minister Herbert H Asquith, is thinking as he disembarks at Dun Laoghaire on May 12 1916, almost three weeks after the Easter Rising. Following six days of intensive fighting, Dublin city centre was unrecogniseable. Practically all its main buildings were destroyed either by artillery fire or burnt out. The list of casualities was horrendous. One hundred and sixteen army dead, 368 wounded, and nine missing. Sixteen policemen died, and 29 wounded. And this at a time when Britain was fighting an appalling war in France, which seemed unending, and its mounting causalities were not only threatening his government’s survival, but had filled the British people with dread and alarm.

 

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