Search Results for 'Catholic church'

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A 1927 election rally

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Our photograph was taken on June 5, 1927 from the platform of a Cumann na nGaedheal election rally in Eyre Square. The crowd (almost entirely male), “looked voters every one”. In the background you can see the Browne Doorway and the Railway Hotel.

Böll weekend gets under way in Achill

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A weekend of literary and artistic talks, workshops, exhibitions and tours gets under way today (Friday May 1) on Achill as the island celebrates its links to the renowned German writer Heinrich Böll.

Literary talks, workshops, and exhibitions for Achill’s Böll celebrations

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Achill is preparing to once again celebrate its links with the Nobel Prize winning German writer Heinrich Böll during the first weekend in May.

'I absolutely hated going to school. Every day I went there I was nervous'

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MEET PAKIE, an orphan, storyteller, adventurer, and survivor. He may not be the sharpest tool in the box, but he does know the history of his native town, from vicious Vikings to less-than Christian Brothers.

Exhibition in Knock will look at mysterious Shroud of Turin

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A new exhibition on the Shroud of Turin, a relic that has fascinated theologians and academics for centuries, is to open in Knock Museum on April 1.

Dave McSavage - he’s not giving up

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DAVID MCSAVAGE, the ‘enfant terrible’ of Irish comedy, makes a welcome return to the Róisín Dubh on Friday February 6 at 8.30pm as part of his Don’t Give Up tour.

‘Galway has something between a tolerance and an appetite for experiment’

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December will be a hectic month for Tommy Tiernan as he undertakes a seven date tour across all corners of County Galway, performing his new show Out Of The Whirlwind. The show, he says, will be a mixture of “storytelling and improv”, but this is also likely to be the last run of ‘world tour of Galway’ styled shows Tommy will do.

The Jesuit church

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On this day, July 31, in 1863, “The new Church of St Ignatius on the Sea Road in the vicinity of the city was dedicated by the Most Rev Dr McEvilly, Lord Bishop of Galway. Sea Road is one of the most fashionable and frequented thoroughfares in the suburbs of our city. The Church, which was commenced in 1861, is now complete with the exception of the organ, altar and some minor internal decorations; and we have no doubt the zeal of the faithful will only require such a desirable opportunity of enabling the Jesuit Fathers, whose excellent judgement in these matters is fully acknowledged, to complete the required improvements, and that nothing shall be wanted which the good taste of the architect can suggest to make everything perfect. The Church is built of hammered limestone ashlar work in courses. The south gable, or principal front, the spire and the quoins, dressings etc, being finely punched and the depths of the jambs and arches of the principal doors and windows, which are richly moulded, adds greatly to its appearance. The Church, which is Gothic in style, is in the form of a Latin Cross, 115 feet in extreme length, 36 feet wide and 70 feet across the transepts, 56 to the ridge and 110 to the top of the spire”.

The First Holy Communion dress did not fit everyone

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If there isn’t some dramatic change, and matters as they stand are allowed to drift, it is easy to see that the impact of the child abuse scandals within the Catholic church have had a very negative impact on the present and future generations in Ireland. Despite being one of the most generous generations ever when it comes to helping others, young people today are quite indifferent to the church. In fact many are openly hostile.

An artist opened Galway’s ‘Secrets Box’

Most families, most adults, and most communities have secrets; past indiscretions they would rather forget about, and usually not very serious. But  some of them can be very painful, and are kept hidden, in a sort of a Secrets Box,  long after they need to be.

 

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