Search Results for 'British army'

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How World War I changed Galway’s horsepower

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Salthill began to really liven up with the arrival of the Dublin to Galway train in 1851. Holidaymakers arrived at the resort in some style. Trains were met at the station by horse-drawn ‘cars’ or ‘buses’ which went out directly to the seaside.

'We feel no nostalgia for the imperial era'

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Galway will host European royalty on Tuesday August 21, when His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Imre de Habsbourg-Lorraine of Austria, will participate in a ceremony at Galway Cathedral honouring his great-grandfather, Blessed Karl of Austria, who, as Karl I, was the last Habsburg Emperor.

Spires House, Shantalla

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In 1924, three Sisters of Jesus and Mary came to UCG to study for a degree, the first religious of any congregation to do so. While they were pursuing their studies, Mother Stanislaus looked for a suitable premises for a house of studies and finally purchased “Spires House” in Shantalla on June 26, 1925. The house apparently got its name from the two unusual spires you can see on the roof. It was used by the sisters as a hostel for secular students as well as their own nuns. These nuns were known to many people as ‘The Spires Nuns’.

Calling all graduates of St Patrick’s National School

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On April 1, 1954, 941 boys marched from the Bish National School, Nuns’ Island, and from the Old Mon in Market Street to their ultra-modern bright new school, St Patrick’s, which was situated at the corner of Lombard Street and Bridge Street. The new school was built on a site which had been the location of the Shambles Barracks, which was occupied by the British army for many years up until 1909.

Liam Mellows - Down and Out in New York

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Week II

Two stories on the ‘crime of being a woman’

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Week III

Cillian Murphy to launch new history book in Galway

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Cillian Murphy, the acclaimed Irish actor and star of Peaky Blinders and Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes The Barley film, will launch a new book on politics of memory in post-independence Ireland.

From Oranmore girl to Derry Girl

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Tonight, Channel 4 broadcasts the second episode of Lisa McGee’s sparky new comedy series, Derry Girls, about a group of teens coping with life, school, families, and the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

C4's Derry Girls and the Galway connection

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THIS THURSDAY, Channel 4 begins broadcasting Derry Girls, a new comedy series set in Derry city in the 1990s - but despite it's Northern Irish setting, the show has strong Galway connections as it stars Galway born Nicola Coughlan, and Galway based comedian Tommy Tiernan.

The Galway City Challenge Hurling Cup 1920

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As nationalist sentiment was rising in the early years of the last century, a new generation of GAA officials emerged who were zealous in their belief in the transformative power of the GAA and they saw themselves as engaged in a project of national liberation. Some GAA tournaments were staged as part of a pro-Boer campaign. Police reports noted: “The ambition it seems to get hold of the youth of the country and educate them in rebellious and seditious ideas,” a somewhat hysterical interpretation of the GAA ban on foreign games.

 

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