Search Results for 'British army'

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‘Deep humiliation and bitterness’

Despite the crucial role many women played in the 1916 Rising, very few were given the credit they deserved. In fact some women were refused a pension for many years because they were not men.

Opportunity to meet author and ex-special forces soldier Phil Tomkins in Athlone Library

Dublin-born Phil Tomkins, an ex-elite forces soldier, now lives in the North of England but is a regular visitor to Ireland, being no stranger to either Moate or Athlone.

‘No time for fainting’

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‘The small girl smiles. One eyelid flickers. She whips a pistol from her knickers. She aims it at the creature’s head. And bang bang bang, she shoots him dead.’

Children of the Revolution

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REBELS AND patriots, soldiers for king and country, all kinds of political opinions and actions could be found among the students of University College Galway during the turbulent years of 1913-1919.

Children of the Revolution

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REBELS AND patriots, soldiers for king and country, all kinds of political opinions and actions could be found among the students of University College Galway during the turbulent years of 1913-1919.

1916 - don’t believe everything they tell you

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The 1916 Rising did not end on April 29 when Pádraig Pearse issued the order to surrender. Many are still fighting it, or, to be more accurate, fighting against it, and, as with any war, the first and most prolonged casualty is the truth.

Kilmovee lecture series lines up some engaging events

 

Theatre review: The Great Push

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THE BATTLE of Loos, which raged from late September to mid-October 1915, was one of the bloodiest clashes of the First World War. The British Army lost some 60,000 men in the engagement, with little to show for it when the guns fell silent.

1916 - 1922 A time of courage, and divided loyalties

I have written before about a terrifying night in Galway when the Black and Tans went berserk following an incident at Galway railway station on September 8 1920. A drunken Tan, Edward Krumm, confronted the crowd of passengers as they emerged from the train. He produced a pistol and began to fire into the air, causing widespread panic. Séan Mulvoy jumped on his back but Krumm managed to shoot him as they fell to the ground. In turn a man stepped from the crowd and shot Krumm dead.

Seamus Carter, athlete, Gaeilgóir, patriot

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Seamus Carter was a fluent Irish speaker who was a member of the Gaelic League since its inception. He was the secretary of the Oireachtas when it was held in Galway in 1913, the famous photograph of which hangs in the Town Hall.

 

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