Search Results for 'Historian'

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Ghosts of Galway’s past

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One of the mysteries of Galway is that curious phrase under the west facing clock on the Galway Camera Shop on William  Street, which says: Dublin Time. The fact that now the clock shows ordinary winter time only adds to the mystery. But not so long ago Galwegians, delighting in the longer days of sunlight than in the east of the country, and displaying an oddity that makes living in Galway a pleasure, set their clocks a full eleven and an half minutes behind Dublin. However, trains had to run to a standardised timetable otherwise transport chaos would ensue. The timetable was set at Dublin time (linked, like the rest of the civilised world, to Greenwich Mean Time), so  as Galwegians hurried to the station they could glance at the clock, and probably have to put on speed (perhaps Galway Time explains why most meetings here are usually 11 minutes late?).

Hill of Uisneach bids to become Royal Heritage Site

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The Hill of Uisneach in Loughnavalley is already deemed to be the mythological and sacred centre of Ireland, and now it’s in the running to become a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) world heritage site.

Gerry Hanberry’s new poetic shoes

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JIMMY NAIL sang about ‘Crocodile Shoes’, Ian Dury had New Boots and Panties, but in his fourth collection of poems, Galway writer Gerry Hanberry ponders What Our Shoes Say About Us.

‘It was the landlord’s right to do as he pleased.’

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The succession by the infamous Marcella Netterville to a large estate near Mount Bellew, Co Galway, in the 1820s owed as much to chance as it was to her unlikely mother-in-law, with the wonderful name, Kitty Cut-a-Dash. The Nettervilles were an ancient Norman family, who came to Galway from County Meath after purchasing land from the Bellew family. A judicious marriage with the Trenchs of Garbally, Ballinasloe, increased their holdings. It appears that for a time both the Nettervilles and their tenants lived at peace and in some prosperity, at least until Frederick Netterville began to spread his wild oats somewhat wide of the field.

Uncertain future for Davitt museum

He is one of Mayo’s most famous sons who came to be known as a world renowned social activist, human rights campaigner, a statesman and an author, described as the Nelson Mandela of his era.

“That’s it for me and politics” - Ruth Illingworth calls it a day

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The first shock in the race for next year’s council elections came to light yesterday (Thursday) with the news that Fine Gael’s Ruth Illingworth is to step away from Mullingar politics for good.

Ruby Wax in Westport for the Rolling Sun Festival

An exciting line up of readings, talks, music and reveling has been announced for the Rolling Sun Book Festival which takes place in Westport from November 15 to 17.

Camogie stars to be honoured at Galway People of the Year Awards

The Galway People of the Year Special Achievement Award which will be presented at the annual awards black tie gala in the Galway Bay Hotel on Friday next November 1 goes to the Galway senior and intermediate camogie teams and management.

Canadian choir to sing in County Galway

NEWFOUNDLAND HAS been described by historian Tim Pat Coogan as “the most Irish place in the world outside of Ireland”.

Quirky exhibitions, old toys, guided tours, and history talks

Athlone Art and Heritage Ltd invites everyone to come and experience National Heritage Week at Athlone Castle visitor centre with a programme of temporary exhibitions and events. Starting Saturday August 17 the week will be filled with a diverse range of activities for all ages.

 

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