Search Results for 'WB'

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Come away oh performance poets...

A slam poetry competition will take place in Thoor Ballylee, the former home of WB Yeats on Saturday October 15, and performance poets are being invited to apply for one of 10 places at the event. This is the first competition of its kind to be held at the tower house.

The west of Ireland lacks civilisation - But it has poetry

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‘The capital, Galway, is a terrible place. It has of course St Nicholas, one of the few remaining pre-Reformation churches; the frontispiece of a Renaissance town house erected as a gateway to the public park; and a medieval fortified house about which they tell the well-known story of the Lynch who hanged his own son when the sheriff wasn't available. At least once a year while I was director of the Abbey theatre we got a play on that. From Miss Edgeworth's account of her travels to Galway it would appear that as a theme for tragedy it was popular a hundred years ago. But even before that I had a lively hatred of the town....'

‘The old lady was a holy terror’

Ireland’s greatest short story writer is probably the late Frank O’Connor (1903-1966). Born in Cork city, his autobiography An Only Child (1961) is ironically a celebration of his vivacious but fastidious mother, and their survival from his alcoholic, and at times brutal, father.

‘Today the Somme is a peaceful but sullen place.’

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One of the great obsessions after the war was how to come to terms with the ‘missing’ - the many thousands of young soldiers who were either vaporised, or blown to pieces, by high explosives; or were drowned and lost in the mud. Last week I tried to tell the heartbreaking search for their missing son Jack, by the Kiplings. For months they haunted hospitals, interviewed soldiers, even dropped leaflets on enemy territory, pleading for information. Even though the Somme still reveals bodies today, Jack Kipling was never found.

‘Too late now to retrieve a fallen dream..’

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Apart from Irish nationalists believing that Home Rule would follow the war if they fought for Britain; or the Ulsterman's belief that after their sacrifice, Britain 'would see them right,' there were other reasons too, that drove young men into the British army at this perilous time in history. Men joined for heroic reasons. There were propaganda warnings that Irish women would be raped, land and farms confiscated, churches burnt and looted if Germany invaded Ireland as it had Belgium.

Coole to host free performance of George Bernard Shaw play

A free public performance of George Bernard Shaw's anti-war play O'Flaherty VC is among the highlights on the calendar of events this month at Coole.

‘Too late now to retrieve a fallen dream..’

Apart from Irish nationalists believing that Home Rule would follow the war if they fought for Britain; or the Ulsterman's belief that after their sacrifice, Britain 'would see them right,' there were other reasons too, that drove young men into the British army at this perilous time in history. Men joined for heroic reasons. There were propaganda warnings that Irish women would be raped, land and farms confiscated, churches burnt and looted if Germany invaded Ireland as it had Belgium.

Thoor Ballylee to reopen in June

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Thoor Ballylee, WB Yeats’s one time home near Gort, will officially re-open to the public on Saturday June 18. The opening will include an exhibition, the first of a number of events planned for the summer.

Timeline of the Rising - an evening of readings, music, and song at Athlone Little Theatre

Athlone Little Theatre is to host an evening of readings, music, and song inspired by the events of the Easter Rising, Trí Cheol, Filíocht agus Amhranaíocht. It will take place on Friday April 22, almost 100 years to the day since the reading of the Proclamation.

Patrick Lafcadio Hearn - the Irishman who loved Japan

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PATRICK LAFCADIO Hearn is the most famous Irishman you have never heard of, but for people in Japan he is an Irish writer whose stature is rivaled only by WB Yeats and James Joyce - and Galway is about to become aware of him through a celebration of his life and work in the city.

 

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