Search Results for 'King'

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Galway’s secret ministry during Penal Times

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The Treaty of Limerick, October 3 1691, which was mainly a military success for the Irish/Jacobite army, was indecisive on its civil articles; and those which were agreed were soon ignored by a vengeful Protestant parliament.

‘This is an important Irish-American immigrant story that hasn’t been told’

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HE WAS a hero and a villain. He was a gang leader who 'terrorised' neighborhoods, yet The New York Times wrote an obituary for him, and he was admired as a staunch supporter and friend of working class and poor Irish immigrants.

SPORTING MEMORIES

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It was the first of many that eventually would follow. Castlegar senior hurlers set the standard, winning Galway's first All Ireland senior club hurling crown in 1980, a competition previously dominated by Cork clubs since 1970. It took 11 years before another Galway club, Kiltormer, would succeed, while Sarsfields, Athenry, Portumna Clarinbridge, and St Thomas have all having delighted hurling fans throughout the county, demonstrating the strength of the game in the west of Ireland.

A time when grass grew on Galway streets

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It is generally agreed that the treaty signed between the Williamite general de Ginkel, and the Irish/Jacobian Patrick Sarsfield, on October 9 1691 in Limerick, was a very satisfactory military outcome for both sides, but not a satisfactory outcome for Catholic Ireland who, with the loss of her armies, was left at the mercy of a vengeful Protestant parliament.

‘We have been left to police it’

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A number of Galway restaurateurs have declared that decisions on who will be admitted to their premises will be based on a customer's whereabouts the previous fortnight.

Pressure on bars to ignore substantial meal law

Bars are under huge pressure by members of the public to ignore the €9 substantial meal law, that is the viewpoint of the owner of The King's Head, Paul Grealish.

Galway awaits its fate in ‘a state of nervousness and excitement’

Following the victory of King William’s army at Aughrim July 12 1691, the people of Galway awaited their fate in fear and uncertainty. William’s Dutch general Godert de Ginkel, had moved from his headquarters at Athenry, and was now on his way to subdue the town. He had shown ruthless determination in his dealings with the Irish Jacobite army; the citizens must have expected nothing less.

My Kind Of Town - a vision for Galway post-Covid-19

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Paul Grealish

Classic Drive-in Cinema COMES TO MAYO THIS WEEKEND!!

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Fasten your seatbelt, bring the popcorn and grab the family and get ready to be entertained. Classic Drive-in Cinema is proud to present Back to the Future 2, Grease, The Lion King & Forest Gump at Westport Rugby Club, Saturday July 11 th & Sunday July 12th Tickets from €25.00 + booking fees are on sale at 1pm today from Ticketweb.ie

Treachery at Aughrim

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The last conventional battle in Irish history was fought on Sunday July 12 1691 at Aughrim, Co Galway. It was by far the bloodiest. In less than 8 hours approximately 8,000 men were killed. Six thousand of them were Irish Jacobites.

 

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