Search Results for 'Gregory'

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Ballylee - ‘To go elsewhere is to leave beauty behind’

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In 1960 Mary Hanley forced open the wedged shut door of the cottage at Thoor Ballylee. She walked into the large damp room. For 12 productive and happy summers, the cottage and its adjoining Norman tower had been the home of WB Yeats , his wife George Hyde Lees, and their two children Anne and Michael. Now, however, the floor was covered with manure. For years it had been used as a cow barn. Pulling aside stones that had blocked exits to keep the cattle enclosed, Mary walked into the dining room, with its magnificent enlarged window overlooking the Streamstown river as it races under the four-arched bridge.

Henry Shefflin to open Kilbeacanty’s new pitch

The 2015 Kilbeacanty seven aside hurling tournament takes place this June Bank Holiday Monday. This year’s competition coincides with the club’s 130 year anniversary celebrations and the official opening of the recently re-developed pitch in Kilbeacanty. 

Some awful things that George Moore said...

You might think that those at the core of the Irish literary renaissance at the beginning of the 20th century, were one big happy family beavering away in their rooms at Lady Gregory's home at Coole, Co Galway. In those early days it was a house full of voices and sounds. Sometimes you heard WB Yeats humming the rhythm of a poem he was cobbling together; or the click-clacking of Lady Gregory's typewriter as she worked on another play for the Abbey. There was the sound of the Gregory grandchildren playing in the garden; the booming voice of George Bernard Shaw, as he complains that he is only allowed to have either butter or jam on his bread, but not both to comply with war rations (He cheated by the way. He put butter on one side of his bread, and when he thought no one was looking, piled jam on the other!); or the voices of the artist Jack Yeats and JM Synge returning from a day messing about on a boat calling out to a shy Sean O'Casey to come out of the library for God's sake and enjoy the summer afternoon.

Annie Kelly, and her quest for love

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Annie Kelly was just 19 when all her dreams appeared to be coming true. Annie was one of 11 children living with her widowed mother at Newgrove, Mountbellew, Co Galway. Her boyfriend, William Murphy, and her brother Thomas had earlier emigrated to Boston. Annie and William were pledged to be married just as soon as Annie got the money to follow him there. Full of excitement the young woman later sailed from Liverpool on the Cunard liner the Lusitania arriving in New York on April 24 1915.

Letter to Sylvia Plath from Ted Hughes (March 1956)

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Sylvia, That night was nothing but getting to know how smooth your body is. The memory of it goes through me like brandy. If you do not come to London to me, I shall come to Cambridge to you. I shall be in London, here, until the 14th. Enjoy Paris...Ted. And bring back brandy. Two bottles.

Mr Yeats, we salute you

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ON A wet morning in 1948, a woman of about 30 and a man of 18 were cycling as fast as they could along Grattan Road. They were watching a boat make its way around Mutton Island, hoping they could make it to the docks before it docked.

The strange exile of a disillusioned ‘Buck Mulligan’

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Following his narrow escape from Republican forces, who were intent on killing him by the banks of the Liffey that cold night in January 1923, Oliver St John Gogarty wisely took himself off to London. He immediately became the toast of polite society there who delighted in his stories and witty conversation.

Kilkenny Group named as EY Entrepreneur of the Year finalist

Marian O’Gorman and son Gregory O’Gorman of the Kilkenny Group have been named as finalists in the annual EY Entrepreneur of the Year Awards.

Sylwia is Galway’s greatest loser

Usually someone might be offended to be called a loser but Sylwia is delighted. The proud 32-year-old has been named Galway’s Slimming World Greatest Loser 2014 because she has lost a fantastic eight stone.

A ‘fumble in a greasy till...’

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‘The proposal to build an art gallery over the River Liffey to house the donation to Dublin of Sir Hugh Lane's art collection has been strongly criticised by the businessman and newspaper proprietor, William Martin Murphy.

 

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