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Liptons in Galway

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In 1871, Thomas Lipton from Glasgow used his savings to open his first shop. By the 1880s he had more than 200 shops. He was an entrepreneur, and when he realised that there was potential for growth in the market for tea, and that the product was too expensive, he went to Ceylon and bought his own tea plantation. He sold his tea at low prices in one pound, half pound, and quarter pound packets, and he advertised it very cleverly: “Direct from the Tea Gardens to the Teapot,” or, “Treat your Lips to a Cup Of Lipton’s Peko Tips Tea, two shillings and eight pence per pound.”

Part of Forster Street, 1905

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This photograph, taken from an old glass slide, shows some important personage in an escorted carriage leaving the Great Southern Hotel. There are some mounted liveried gentlemen in front and two RIC men on horseback behind the carriage, which is hidden by the RIC men. You can see a policeman on foot to the right of our picture.

'Being on the edge of Europe gives us a different perspective on the world'

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NUI Galway starts 2018 with a new president at the helm, Prof Ciarán Ó hÓgartaigh, who comes to the university after a seven-year stint as principal and dean of UCD College of Business, leading its schools in Dublin and its overseas programmes.

Lord Haw-Haw, the early years

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In 1915, a short, fair-haired, blue-eyed, boy was sent to the Jes. He later recalled the staff and the pupils as being tough. Latin was supreme and an excitable Latin teacher banged boys’ heads on the radiator. The Jesuits instilled in him a sense of discipline and an acceptance of punishment, and they left him with a love of language — his classmates would note how he used big and strange words — as well as a passion for debate. His uncle Gilbert once remarked, “The boy had a strong tendency to argue with his teachers.”

Curtain rises tonight on nine nights of theatre at Claregalway Drama Festival

Claregalway Community Centre will once again be transformed into a cosy theatre for the 35th Annual Claregalway Drama Festival when the curtain opens tonight Thursday March 16 and runs until Friday 24th inclusive.

Ex gangland boss to speak in Knocknacarra church

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A former London gangster, who served two prison sentences and only turned his life around after nearly killing a man outside a nightclub in the English capital, will speak at an advent mission in St John the Apostle Church in Knocknacarra next month.

A digital twist to the west of Ireland’s latest tourist attraction

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Last week the Achill Experience added a digital dimension to its cultural and historical attractions with the release of the Offline Tourist Tablet. Gerry Quinn, president of the Mayo Cleveland Association, who officially launched the Offline Tourist Tablet, said he “could not believe the transformation in the space of a year” and that he believes the plans for the future of the Achill Experience are “phenomenal."

Ghostly Galway tales in Fringe show Haunted

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GHOSTLY TALES, and stories of the supernatural, which have been gathered from around Galway, will be told in Haunted, a new play from new theatre company Ferocious Composure, which makes its bow at the Galway Fringe Festival this weekend.

‘No time for fainting’

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‘The small girl smiles. One eyelid flickers. She whips a pistol from her knickers. She aims it at the creature’s head. And bang bang bang, she shoots him dead.’

Is It About A Bicycle?

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TOMORROW MARKS the 50th anniversary of the death of Flann O’Brien, a major figure in 20th century Irish literature and postmodern writing, and his life and work will be celebrated in Galway.

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