Search Results for 'policeman'

22 results found.

Peg Broderick-Nicholson and the War Of Independence

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Peg was born at 17 Prospect Hill of parents with a strong nationalist outlook. She went to school in ‘The Pres’, where after the 1916 Rising there was a pitched battle between the wearers of the red, white, and blue badges (common during World War I) and those wearing green, white, and gold badges. The green side won, but then all the badges were confiscated by Mother Brendan.

The Auxiliaries in Galway

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As the guerrilla war attacks by the Irish Volunteers on the RIC began to escalate in 1919, the British government recruited World War I veterans as a complementary force to the RIC. It advertised for men willing “to face a tough and dangerous task”. These were the Black and Tans. A further campaign was launched to recruit former army officers who were specifically formed into counter insurgency units known as the Auxiliaries or ‘The Auxies’. They wore distinctive ‘Tam O’Shanter’ caps. One of these units, D Company, was stationed in Lenaboy Castle and in ‘The Retreat’ in Salthill.

When Loughrea was a ‘den of infamy’

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WITH ALL the attention being given to the run-up to the 1916 Rising, the event itself, and its aftermath, little if anything has been written in relation to the Land War, which took place some 35 years before Pearse stood in the steps of the GPO and read the Proclamation.

Humble but happy homes

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The library of Congress in Washington kindly lent us this photograph (originally one half of a stereo photograph), which was taken in 1903. It shows “The humble but happy homes of the Claddagh fisher folk, Galway”.

Kamal Ibrahim and the magic of Aladdin

SINCE THE 1700s, when a Syrian storyteller told the tale of Aladdin and His Magic Lamp to French writer Antoine Galland, the story has enchanted and delighted generations the world over.

The Third Policeman for the Town Hall

The Third Policeman, the celebrated novel written by Irish writer Brian O’Nolan, is to be turned into a stage adaptation for the Town Hall Theatre.

‘ Prepared to fight and to die’ for Ireland

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The general election of 1918 was also a plebiscite on the Easter Rising, two years previously. The Rising, and the destruction of the centre of Dublin, had been generally condemned. The Irish Parliamentary Party, under John Redmond, had been inching towards Home Rule; why bother with such violence? The belief was that the men and women of 1916 were brave, if foolhardy. Yet following the prolonged executions of the leaders, the massive round up of participants, and their imprisonment in Britain, a change of attitudes swept the country. This was perfectly illustrated in the election held on a bleak December day 1918. Sinn Féin had fielded candidates in every constituency. The campaign was vigorous and tough.

‘A situation only interests me when it becomes very fraught’

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AMONG THE many exciting authors making their way to Galway for next month’s Cúirt International Festival of Literature, is the much-praised American fiction writer Ben Marcus.

The man who almost sent Monty to his doom

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On the eve of taking up a world prestigious position no one had such a baptism of fire as Lord Michael Killanin in September 1972. He was to succeed the autocratic Avery Brundage as president of the International Olympic Committee, and was regarded as a breath of fresh air.

Win tickets to The Guard @ Omniplex

THE GUARD is the new Irish comedy starring the great Brendan Gleeson as Sergeant Gerry Boyle, a small-town Irish policeman.

 

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