Search Results for 'official'

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Ballinasloe gearing up for Féile Cheoil Larry Reynolds

Féile Cheoil Larry Reynolds takes place from Friday to Sunday, September 8 to 10, with a host of music and heritage events on offer in Ballinasloe.

A history of Reek Sunday

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In 1432, Pope Eugene IV issued a document that lay in obscurity deep within the Vatican vaults for centuries. When the doors of the archives and library of the Holy See were thrown open during the papacy of Pope Leo XIII (1878-1903), the British government sent a team of historians to transcribe everything they could find relating to Ireland. As a result of that investigative trawl, the well-known historian William Henry Grattan Flood presented Dr John Healy, Archbishop of Tuam, with a medieval document that detailed Rome’s official 15th century stance regarding the Croagh Patrick pilgrimage. The document, dated 27 September 1432, states, “Pope Eugene IV grants to the Archbishop of Tuam [at the time Seán Mac Feorais, aka John de Bermingham] an indulgence of two years and two quarantines [one quarantine was a penance of 40 days], on the usual conditions, for those penitents who visit and give alms toward the repair of the fabric of the chapel of St Patrick on the mountain which is called Croagh Patrick: this indulgence to be gained on the Sunday preceding the Feast of St Peter’s Chains [August 1]: because on that day a great multitude resorts thither to venerate St Patrick in the said chapel.” Archbishop Healy revived the old tradition of pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick and built the present church on its summit in 1905. But the history of the pilgrimage goes back further than the 1400s.

Furbo Art 2017

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THE SECOND annual Furbo Art exhibition returns to the meeting hall of the Furbo Baptist Church, displaying work by 17 professional artists, drawn from the Na Forbacha area and the Baptist congregation.

Addicted to politics? Just wait for the exit poll...

Well, I do not know where to begin this week with all the mayhem we have had in the UK, in the North, here at home, in France and, I am sure, elsewhere. Some of the mayhem was good, but some was bad.

The Quiet Man who caused quite a racket

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In terms of professional recognition and box office takings, the 1952 film The Quiet Man was a big success, the romantic comedy-drama was a gamble for Irish American director John Ford who was, until then, known largely for his high octane Westerns. The gamble paid off and Ford scooped his fourth Best Director Oscar for The Quiet Man. Though the film's stars John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara did not receive nominations, the film was nominated for seven awards and eventually won two at the 1953 Academy Awards. Its success was good news for Ireland, especially along the Mayo-Galway border, and the village of Cong in particular, where the film had been shot. Ford and his Hollywood entourage arrived in the west in the summer of 1951 to begin recording the film's outdoors scenes. The production had brought welcome employment to the area and the end result showcased the beauty of the region to a global audience.

Good news for Harriet as Kleber has deportation order rescinded

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There was good news for Ballinasloe woman Harriet Bruce this week when it was confirmed that herself and her husband, who was deported in error to Brazil in July, are to be reunited in the near future.

Take me to your leader

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Were Clint Eastwood to ride into town on a steed, canter across Eyre Square, before a final gallop up College Road to City Hall, stride in and demand of the first official he meets, "Just who is Fianna Fáil's man in this town?", what answer would he get?

Connected Talent assembles Galway 2020 Culture team

Recruitment specialists Connected Talent are bringing all of their UK City of Culture experience to bear on sourcing and attracting the entire staff complement for the new Galway 2020 company.

Work begins on €4.2 million Oughterard Wastewater Treatment Plant

Work has begun on the long awaited Oughterard Wastewater Treatment Plant, with the official ‘turning of the sod’ carried out this morning by the Minister for Gaeltacht Affairs and Natural Resources, Seán Kyne.

Work begins on €4.2 million Oughterard Wastewater Treatment Plant

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Work has begun on the long awaited Oughterard Wastewater Treatment Plant, with the official 'turning of the sod' carried out this morning by the Minister for Gaeltacht Affairs and Natural Resources, Seán Kyne.

 

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