Search Results for 'lombard street'

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The Connacht Mineral Water Company

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The Connacht Mineral Water Company was incorporated 80 years ago tomorrow, on July 6 1938. The first board meeting was held on July 18 and the following were appointed as directors: John Keane, chairman; John E Cotter, vice-chairman; and Paul O’Dea, secretary and managing director.

Calling all graduates of St Patrick’s National School

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On April 1, 1954, 941 boys marched from the Bish National School, Nuns’ Island, and from the Old Mon in Market Street to their ultra-modern bright new school, St Patrick’s, which was situated at the corner of Lombard Street and Bridge Street. The new school was built on a site which had been the location of the Shambles Barracks, which was occupied by the British army for many years up until 1909.

St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church, 1823

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This drawing of the Collegiate Church was done in December 1823 (at about 2pm according to the clock) by EW Thompson. It was presented to the vestry by another EW Thompson of Tullymore, Broughshane, Co Antrim, in 1947.

Pro Deo et Patria

St Patrick's boys primary school situated in the heart of Galway city and with a long and illustrious history dating back to the time of the Great Famine, has announced that its annual open day will take place on Wednesday November 29 2017, starting at 2pm.

One Night Stand – adapting Louis CK for Vodafone Comedy Carnival

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REVERED US comic Louis CK’s Horace and Pete was a one-series webcast black comedy described as "Cheers on Prozac" and which won a Peabody Award. Written and directed by Louis CK, who also starred as bar-owner Horace, it featured such stellar supporting players as Steve Buscemi, Edie Falco, Alan Alda, and Jessica Lange.

New pre and after-school to open at St Pat’s school

A new preschool and afterschool centre for three to five year olds will open at St Patrick's primary school in Lombard Street next month.

One hundred and seventy five years of Mercy education in Galway

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The Sisters of Mercy came to Galway on May 1 1840. They started, in extremely difficult circumstances, in Lombard Street with three postulants. The need for uncloistered sisters who would be free to go about the streets and visit the poor in home, hospital, and jail was very great at the time. They were out and about the day after their arrival. An epidemic of cholera had broken out and they helped to nurse the ill and alleviate distress. They quickly prospered to become “Reputedly the best institution that ever was in Galway”.

 

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