Search Results for 'historian'

54 results found.

Saint Anthony’s College

image preview

The Franciscans first came to Galway in 1296 and founded the Abbey. In 1483, a school of advanced theology was instituted there. When the Cromwellians invaded the city, the friars were expelled. In 1657, the friary was destroyed and the church was turned into a courthouse — the present courthouse stands on the same site. In 1660, a new church was erected on the present site of the Abbey. There were 13 friars there in 1766, and eight years later a novitiate was opened here. The present friary was built or rebuilt in 1820, and the present church opened c1836. It was renovated in the 1970s and became the first Franciscan parish in 1971.

Christobel Pankhurst tells Galway audience: ‘Now is the time’

image preview

Week II

Pilgrims and pilgrimage: on the way to eEaster

When in April the sweet showers fall

From skullduggery to a fishing industry

image preview

We know very little about manmade piers and quays along the western seaboard before the beginning of the 19th century, when a lavish programme of safe harbours were built not only to encourage fishing, but as relief programmes in times of distress. It was also an attempt to replace the activities of piracy and smuggling with an industry based on the believed bounty from the sea.

Liam O'Flaherty's WWI records to go on display in Galway

image preview

IN SEPTEMBER 1917, while fighting in Flanders during World War I, Liam O’Flaherty was seriously injured, suffering shell-shock, the trauma of which remained with him all his life.

Remembering Connemara journalist Nollaig Ó Gadhra

image preview

A collection of essays celebrating the life and work of Nollaig Ó Gadhra, journalist, lecturer, historian and activist, will be launched tomorrow Friday September 29 in the Connemara Coast Hotel in Furbo by Junior Minister Seán Kyne TD.

The Mayor of the Claddagh talk

image preview

The Claddagh fishing village was a unique settlement which developed outside the walls of medieval Galway which traditionally elected its own mayor, or king.

Bonamh Market comes back to Castlebar

Mayo Heritage Week agus Gnó Mhaigh Eo, will be bringing back, for one day only, the traditional bonamh and farmers’ market that took place for years on Rush Street, on Saturday next, August 26.

Two Aran Islanders and the Russian Revolution

image preview

FÉILE NA bhFlaitheartach is different from other summer schools. It is not a talking shop for Official Ireland, but a commemoration of two Aran Island born brothers, who went into the world with a desire to change it.

A history of Reek Sunday

image preview

In 1432, Pope Eugene IV issued a document that lay in obscurity deep within the Vatican vaults for centuries. When the doors of the archives and library of the Holy See were thrown open during the papacy of Pope Leo XIII (1878-1903), the British government sent a team of historians to transcribe everything they could find relating to Ireland. As a result of that investigative trawl, the well-known historian William Henry Grattan Flood presented Dr John Healy, Archbishop of Tuam, with a medieval document that detailed Rome’s official 15th century stance regarding the Croagh Patrick pilgrimage. The document, dated 27 September 1432, states, “Pope Eugene IV grants to the Archbishop of Tuam [at the time Seán Mac Feorais, aka John de Bermingham] an indulgence of two years and two quarantines [one quarantine was a penance of 40 days], on the usual conditions, for those penitents who visit and give alms toward the repair of the fabric of the chapel of St Patrick on the mountain which is called Croagh Patrick: this indulgence to be gained on the Sunday preceding the Feast of St Peter’s Chains [August 1]: because on that day a great multitude resorts thither to venerate St Patrick in the said chapel.” Archbishop Healy revived the old tradition of pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick and built the present church on its summit in 1905. But the history of the pilgrimage goes back further than the 1400s.

 

Page generated in 0.0429 seconds.