Search Results for 'historian'

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What the so called ‘empty frame’ may have looked like...

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Last month Galway Diary explored the sham legend that grew around the so-called ‘Empty frame’ on the wall of the Lynch’s Chapel, or Lady’s chapel, in the historic St Nicholas’ Collegiate church. The late Canon George Quinn pronounced that this was the very frame in which the Bishop of Clonfert, Walter Lynch’s sacred icon of the Madonna and Child once hung, before he was forced to flee just before the arrival of Cromwell’s soldiers in April 1652.

History is not kind to Liam Mellows

Week V

Galway International Arts Festival 2018

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A PSYCHEDELIC journey for the ears with The Flaming Lips, and for the eyes and feet with the Miracoco Luminarium installation; getting up close and personal and with the moon (even its dark side); to harrowing stories from victims of the Syrian civil war to a survivor of the Holocaust - this is the Galway International Arts Festival 2018.

Entropy to open in Castlebar

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Visual artist Katie Moore is creating a new installation Entropy which will be exhibited at the Linenhall Arts Centre, Castlebar from Friday, May 4 and will run until Sunday, June 2.

The ‘tradition’ of the Empty Frame

Week IV

Saint Anthony’s College

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The Franciscans first came to Galway in 1296 and founded the Abbey. In 1483, a school of advanced theology was instituted there. When the Cromwellians invaded the city, the friars were expelled. In 1657, the friary was destroyed and the church was turned into a courthouse — the present courthouse stands on the same site. In 1660, a new church was erected on the present site of the Abbey. There were 13 friars there in 1766, and eight years later a novitiate was opened here. The present friary was built or rebuilt in 1820, and the present church opened c1836. It was renovated in the 1970s and became the first Franciscan parish in 1971.

Christobel Pankhurst tells Galway audience: ‘Now is the time’

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Week II

Pilgrims and pilgrimage: on the way to eEaster

When in April the sweet showers fall

From skullduggery to a fishing industry

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We know very little about manmade piers and quays along the western seaboard before the beginning of the 19th century, when a lavish programme of safe harbours were built not only to encourage fishing, but as relief programmes in times of distress. It was also an attempt to replace the activities of piracy and smuggling with an industry based on the believed bounty from the sea.

Liam O'Flaherty's WWI records to go on display in Galway

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IN SEPTEMBER 1917, while fighting in Flanders during World War I, Liam O’Flaherty was seriously injured, suffering shell-shock, the trauma of which remained with him all his life.

 

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