Search Results for 'headmaster'

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The boy who burnt his hand

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On Sunday evening March 25 1866, the two children of the schoolmaster Mr St George, were playing near the fire together in the Mission School (now Scoil Fhursa), when suddenly there was an explosion. The elder child burnt his hand. His injuries put him into a ‘very precarious position’. I am not sure how serious that was, but the story took an insidious turn when it was given out that ‘some malicious person climbed on the roof, and threw a packet of gunpowder down the chimney.’

Galway Grammar School, 1903

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Galway Grammar School was a Protestant institution established under the Erasmus Smith Trust in 1669. It opened around 1675 and has been located at College Road since 1815. The 1950/51 school year was an eventful one when, in November of that year, a wing of the school was gutted by fire, happily, there was no danger of loss of life. Four months later a dormitory ceiling collapsed. The headmaster, George Coughlan, said that the collapse was caused by a 24 foot beam being charred through by a chimney fire. The beam brought down two other beams and half the ceiling. In many old buildings, beams went into chimney flues and successive chimney fires charred them until they came down. Neither incident occasioned an interruption in the school routine.

School around the corner gets top marks

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Colleran auctioneer's next auction will include No 87 Bohermore, a former school just off Eyre Square and now the location of a spacious five bedroom home. A primary school operated from here from 1852 until 1920, when the pupils marched in formation with their headmaster Mr Lohan to the new St Brendan's School in Woodquay.

‘A bold, imaginative, staging’

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ONE OF the very best shows at last year’s Galway International Arts Festival was Andrew Flynn’s brilliant large-cast staging of Pat McCabe’s The Dead School. The production was presented by the combined talents of Galway Youth Theatre and Galway Community Theatre, and Flynn has now re-assembled the same cast for a revival by Decadent Theatre Company at the Town Hall Theatre.

The first co-ed class in the Jes

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St Ignatius College’ on Sea Road opened its doors for the first time in 1862. The Jesuits built a residence and a church at the same time and the move proved to be a success for them. Attendances at Mass and ceremonies grew rapidly. The college, however, was more of a challenge. The boys ranged in age from nine to 13 and the subjects taught included mathematics, Latin, Greek, and elocution. The numbers at first were as expected. They grew steadily to 90 in 1865 and reached 110 by 1874, but they began to fall thereafter and were inconsistent from year to year. The number recorded for 1899 was 49. 

 

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