Search Results for 'commanding officer'

7 results found.

Kenneth Webb - 'The west always called me'

image preview

A 64-year relationship between an artist and a gallery is rare, but that is how long the painter Kenneth Webb and the Kenny Gallery have been working together. Since he first walked in their door in Galway, both the gallery and the artist’s work have gone through many changes.

Christmas Greetings Galway from the troops of 54th Infantry Group in Golan

image preview

While you and your family are tucking into your festive dinner in the warmth and comfort of your homes and family circles, worrying about last-minute gifts, and whether or not to put an extra bottle of wine into the fridge, spare a thought for the troops of the 54th Infantry Group who will be at democracy’s outpost as part of the UNDOF mission on the Golan Heights throughout the holiday period.

‘Boxer’ intervenes with Taoiseach to have Jadotville siege soldiers honoured

image preview

Longford-Westmeath Independent Deputy, Kevin ‘Boxer’ Moran, has met Taoiseach Enda Kenny concerning the honouring of soldiers who fought in the Siege of Jadotville, the majority of whom were from Custume Barracks in Athlone.

Castlebar comes to a standstill as Ben Garrett is laid to rest

Castlebar came to a standstill on Wednesday afternoon and the business community shut their doors as the funeral of Private Ben Garrett, Kilnock, Breaffy, Castlebar, passed through the streets of the town in a military cortege before his burial in the New Cemetery in Castlebar. Private Garrett's body was found last Sunday in Galway following an 18 day search that saw hundreds of people scour the city and its surrounds on a daily basis looking for him after he was reported missing.

Children of the Revolution

image preview

REBELS AND patriots, soldiers for king and country, all kinds of political opinions and actions could be found among the students of University College Galway during the turbulent years of 1913-1919.

Children of the Revolution

image preview

REBELS AND patriots, soldiers for king and country, all kinds of political opinions and actions could be found among the students of University College Galway during the turbulent years of 1913-1919.

Galway in the weeks leading up to the Rising

image preview

On Tuesday 25 April 1916, Galway became the only county outside of Leinster to take up arms against the British state during the Easter Rising. In fact, only three parts of provincial Ireland participated in the Rising: Enniscorthy in county Wexford; Ashbourne in north county Dublin; and county Galway, where several hundred rebels took over 600 square miles of the east of the county between Tuesday 25 April and Saturday 29 April. Commemorative documentaries and history books pay little attention to the Galway Rising with the focus tending to be on the more dramatic events that took place in Dublin, but Galway’s Rising was an important part of the story of the Easter Rising; and the story of the hundreds of brave Galway men who stood up to the British Empire in April 1916 deserves to be told in detail. In this series of five articles, FERGUS CAMPBELL will explain why Galway rose when so many other parts of provincial Ireland did not, and he will also tell the story of what happened in Galway during the Rising, and the impact that the Rising had on Galway society. This account is based on many documents, police reports, newspaper accounts and memoirs but most of the quotations are derived from the witness statements that Galway rebels made to the Bureau of Military History during the 1940s and 1950s, and these can be read online.

 

Page generated in 0.0418 seconds.