Search Results for 'Willie'

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Conal Gallen - How's Your Father?

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HOW’S YOUR Father? the new comedy play by comedian Conal Gallen and his son Rory, comes to the the Town Hall Theatre Galway on Saturday September 23 at 8pm.

"How’s Your Father?"

Father and son team Conal and Rory Gallen have written probably their funniest comedy play to date, "How's Your Father?" is a non-stop, laugh a minute riot of craic, confusion, and constant laughter.

Lord Haw-Haw, the early years

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In 1915, a short, fair-haired, blue-eyed, boy was sent to the Jes. He later recalled the staff and the pupils as being tough. Latin was supreme and an excitable Latin teacher banged boys’ heads on the radiator. The Jesuits instilled in him a sense of discipline and an acceptance of punishment, and they left him with a love of language — his classmates would note how he used big and strange words — as well as a passion for debate. His uncle Gilbert once remarked, “The boy had a strong tendency to argue with his teachers.”

‘Lord, thou art hard on mothers’

Where is more beautiful, Connemara or Kerry?

‘They all died well, but MacDonagh died like a prince.’

Padraic Pearse, the self-identified President of the Provisional Government, and Commandant-General of the Army of the Irish Republic was rushed to the gallows, or in this case to the grim stonebreakers yard at Kilmainham jail.

‘If we do nothing else we shall rid Ireland of three bad poets’

Poetry more than any other art form is intimately connected with the events of Easter 1916. Three of the executed signatories of the Proclamation, Padraic Pearse, Thomas MacDonagh (Tomás Mac Donnchadha) and Joseph Mary Plunkett were recognised poets of their day, who had used their poems to espouse the cause of revolutionary nationalism.

‘The face and voice of the coming revolution’

Week IV

The gentle warrior within the man

Between 1903 and 1915 Padraig Pearse spent as much time time as he could salvage from the press of affairs in Dublin at Ros Muc. In 1907 he built a cottage overlooking lake Eileabhrach. He became a familiar figure and popular in the neighbourhood. He was known affectionately as ‘An Piarsach.’ As well as his political speeches and editorials for An Claidheamh Soluis (The Sword of Light), he absorbed the culture and language of the people, and wrote short stories and poems.

A family visit to Ros Muc

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I have been asked how did Pádraig Pearse travel to Ros Muc in the first place, surely it was a burdensome task to get there from Dublin. He had no car, but a bicycle which he kept at his cottage.

The stranger standing at Maam Cross Station

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There was a humorous mix-up when Pádraig Pearse first visited Ros Muc in 1903. He was 24 years of age, and already imbued by a passion, and a vision for the Ireland of the new century. *

 

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