Search Results for 'Trieste'

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Nora Barnacle’s Galway years

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NORA BARNACLE, famous as the liberated woman who stole James Joyce’s heart and who stood by him during numerous controversies, is the subject of a new play.

Rising star of classical piano to play Galway

THE MUSIC of Albéniz, Beethoven, and Schubert, and the world première of a new piece by Jane O’Lear,y will be performed by Ah Ruem Ahm in Galway next week.

Nora Barnacle documentary to be broadcast on St Stephen’s Day

Nora Barnacle, the Galwegian who married James Joyce’ and inspired some of his greatest writings, will be the subject of a new radio documentary.

The knocking ceremony

AFTER A requiem Mass at Vienna’s St Stephen’s Cathedral, the funeral party entered Vienna’s Capuchin Friary (Kapuzinerkirche) after the following “knocking” ceremony.

Expect pounding heaviness from Italy’s The Secret

TRIESTE IN northern Italy in best known to the Irish as the city where James Joyce spent time, writing part of what would become Ulysses.

Remembering Nora on Bloomsday

Nora Barnacle left Galway early in 1904. She was 20 years old, a strong-willed girl running from a tyrannical uncle who disapproved of her latest boy friend. Within weeks of her arrival in Dublin she would become the muse and lover of James Joyce and the inspiration of some and his greatest works — Greta Conroy in The Dead, Bertha the common law wife in Exiles and Molly Bloom in Ulysses — all share some of Nora’s character and experiences. In October of that same year Nora and Jim would elope to Europe and in due course step on to the pages of literary history. She would return to her native city only twice during her 47 years of exile before dying in Zurich in 1951, having lived 67 tumultuous years.

Lady Gregory’s ‘missing’ grandson

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Following the success of the publication Me and Nu - Childhood at Coole published in 1970,* it is sometimes forgotten that Lady Augusta Gregory had three grandchildren, and not two as is often assumed. Written by Lady Gregory’s granddaughter Anne, Me and Nu is a charming account of life at Coole, as the children watched with amusement (and disillusionment at their human foibles), many of the great figures of the Irish literary movement of the 20th century as they came and went.

Anne of Coole Park

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I brought her a bag of apples on our first ‘date’. Not very romantic, I hear you say. True. And not very generous. Also true (Tesco special offer – one pound for a ‘family bag’). I was merely continuing a tradition. She was Anne Gregory and during her childhood at Coole Park, “every year John Quinn, Grandma’s great friend in New York, used to send a great case of apples to us.” So it is recorded in Anne’s beautiful book Me and Nu, Childhood at Coole. ‘Nu’ was Anne’s sister, Catherine. If you haven’t read Me and Nu, treat yourself to a copy for the New Year. It is still in print after nearly 40 years.

 

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