Search Results for 'Salmon Weir Bridge'

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Moon’s Corner and The Stoic Man

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THE STRUCTURE of Gerald Dawe’s memoir The Stoic Man, recently published by the Lagan Press, follows much the same general outline of his Selected Poems, published in 2012, and could easily be subtitled A Tale of Three Cities, beginning in the troubled city of Belfast, continuing on to the cultural melting pot that was Galway during the 1970s and 1980s, before moving on the comfortable avenues of Dún Laoghaire and the ivory towers of Trinity College.

The things Galway makes young artists think of

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ARTWORKS MIMICKING 12” vinyl on a record player, a man with an ever growing beard, a giraffe crossing the Salmon Weir bridge - all of these can be seen in a new exhibition in the Galway Arts Centre.

Akumakon 2015 - Galway’s celebration of Japan and manga

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YUTAKA YAMAMOTO, the Japanese animator and director who created a cartoon series set in Galway, will discuss how and why the city was such an inspiration to him, when he attends this year’s Akumakon festival.

Patricia’s vocation did not take root

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Patricia Burke Brogan joined the noviciate of the Mercy Sisters at the convent of St Vincent, Newtownsmith, Galway  at the end of the 1950s.  It was before the reforms of Vatican II had relaxed rule of the heavy medieval habit, the shorn hair, and a constant reminder ‘to keep custody of the eyes’. What was called ‘discipline’, which was nothing less than outrageous bullying, was meted out on the novices by some of the older nuns, in a cutting and wounding way. The nuns were hard on each other.

The Corrib Drainage Scheme

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The waterways of the city are of great engineering significance. Two major projects resulted in the waterways system which exists today. The first scheme was constructed between 1848 and 1858. Its primary purpose was to improve drainage thus reducing winter water levels and the areas of flooded land and also navigation, without any detrimental effect on the mills or fishery interests. So the Eglinton canal was built, the Claddagh Basin, the dredging of the Corrib, Gaol and Western rivers, tailraces, culverts, the weir and salmon pass and Steamer’s Quay at Woodquay

Final touches going into St Patrick’s Day parades plans

The preparations for the St Patrick’s Day parades are well underway across the county. The county town will see its parade take place a day early this year due to Castlebar Mitchels involvement in the All Ireland Club Final in Croke Park on St Patrick’s Day.

Ballina goes green for St Patrick’s festival

Ballina Chamber of Commerce is getting ready to turn the town green for the St Patrick’s Weekend festival.

Charming two storey townhouse in the heart of Galway

Sherry FitzGerald is a joint agent with Colleran auctioneers on No 2 Corrib Terrace, Woodquay, Galway. This is a charming and surprisingly spacious two storey townhouse overlooking a green in the heart of Galway city.

Remembering Myles Joyce

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In April 1980, I interviewed Mrs Sarah Lynskey from Bridge Street, on her 100th birthday, for this column. In the course of our conversation, she told me her earliest memory was of “kneeling on the Salmon Weir Bridge with my mother and a lot of Claddagh women praying. I know they were Claddagh women because I can still see the triangles of shawl as they knelt on the bridge. We were praying for a fellow, they were going to hang him the next day. Joyce was his name”. She was talking about Myles Joyce, an innocent man who was to be hanged along with two others for the Maamtrasna murders.

Looking over the Salmon Weir Bridge

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This charming drawing appeared in a London newspaper called The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News which was published on October 4, 1879. It shows a group of men and boys (no females) watching the salmon waiting to go upstream. On the right is a study of a water bailiff. The drawing was made by M.F., and his accompanying text is very flowery.

 

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