Search Results for 'Railway Hotel'

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A 1927 election rally

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Our photograph was taken on June 5, 1927 from the platform of a Cumann na nGaedheal election rally in Eyre Square. The crowd (almost entirely male), “looked voters every one”. In the background you can see the Browne Doorway and the Railway Hotel.

Some awful things that George Moore said...

Week IV

Old Galway’s hidden urban landscape

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ONE OF the great pleasures of the early morning walk, jog, or run through the streets of Galway is that you can experience our urban landscape unencumbered with either human or motorised traffic.

Three generations celebrate nuptials at Hotel Meyrick

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Patricia Burke became the third Burke woman to celebrate her wedding day at the Hotel Meyrick when she wed husband Erik do Oliveira Santos recently.

The view from the distillery, c1885

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Towards the end of last year, we featured a series of articles on the building that is now occupied by the students’ bar in NUIG. The building started as a jute bag factory, then was converted to a bonded warehouse for Persse’s Distillery, later became the National Shell factory during World War I, was occupied by the 17th Lancers and the 6th Dragoon Guards, before being converted into the ammunitions factory known as IMI.

Connemara becomes battlefield in Tan war

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Week III

Connemara becomes battlefield in Tan war

Week III

Hotel Meyrick celebrates one hundred and sixty years at the heart of hospitality in Galway

Since opening its doors in 1852, the luxury four star Hotel Meyrick which overlooks the historic Eyre Square at the heart of Galway City has welcomed more than six million visitors.

The Crimean cannon

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August 3 1857 was a day of celebration in Galway as the British War Department handed over two Russian cannons to the town commissioners. These cannon were described as “64 pounders of a heavy and clumsy description, each weighing two tons”, and were part of a large amount of Russian ordnance which fell into the hands of the 88th regiment during the Crimean War. Many of these artillery pieces were presented by the War Department as trophies to cities and town across the British Isles.

Remembering Nora on Bloomsday

Nora Barnacle left Galway early in 1904. She was 20 years old, a strong-willed girl running from a tyrannical uncle who disapproved of her latest boy friend. Within weeks of her arrival in Dublin she would become the muse and lover of James Joyce and the inspiration of some and his greatest works — Greta Conroy in The Dead, Bertha the common law wife in Exiles and Molly Bloom in Ulysses — all share some of Nora’s character and experiences. In October of that same year Nora and Jim would elope to Europe and in due course step on to the pages of literary history. She would return to her native city only twice during her 47 years of exile before dying in Zurich in 1951, having lived 67 tumultuous years.

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