Search Results for 'Radio ireann'

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A night of Irish trad at the Town Hall

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THE TURBULENT, inspirational, and ever-evolving journey of Irish music, will be performed by 16 traditional musicians, in the Town Hall Theatre tomorrow night.

Who fears to speak of Ernie O’Malley?

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This week’s title borrows from John Kells Ingram’s famous 1843 political ballad, "The Memory of the Dead". In his poem, Ingram posits that later generations turned their fattened backs on the memory of the rebels of 1798, "Who Fears to Speak of '98?" Ingram was not a republican, but he penned his piece for the nationalist paper The Nation because he sympathised with what the United Irishmen had attempted to do and he had always pledged to defend brave men who opposed tyranny.

See Mise Éire in Clifden

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THE SOUNDTRACK to Mise Éire, Sean Ó Riada's great orchestral achievement, marrying classical and traditional Irish forms, is, especially its main theme, one of the most stirring and powerful works of Irish music, so powerful it is better known than the film.

'Radio Éireann was a university of the air for me'

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How did Terry Wogan inaugurate young announcers? Why did the newsreader fall off the chair? What caused Larry Gogan to collapse in giggles? Irish radio is not always as serious as it has sounded.

St Patrick's Brass Band

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If you think Saint Patrick’s Brass band seems to have been around forever, you are almost right. It was founded 119 years ago in 1896, in Forster Street by Peter Rabbitte, Michael Spelman, and Paddy Walsh. It was originally a fife and drum band known as St Patrick’s Fife and Drum Band Society.

A letter from Seamus Heaney

Irish traditional music is one of the great survivors of history. Maybe it was because we are an island, way off on our own in the western Atlantic, and until the latter decades of the last  century, out of hearing from the mass cultural movements of popular cinema, radio and TV, especially the modern music from Europe and the US, that something distinctive has survived. As a boy I would only hear traditional music sessions in a few Gaelteacht areas, or from the welcoming Standún family in Spiddal, or at the Féiseanna at An Taibhdhearc, which was more memorable for the day off from school than it was for the music.

 

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