Search Results for 'Pub'

22 results found.

Taylor’s Bar

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This late 19th century building in Upper Dominick Street was originally a grocery and a pub owned by a family of O’Connells. They used to stable horses out the back. When they sold it, they moved to Dublin where one of them was unfortunately murdered. The pub was taken over by a Mr Cosgrave.

Pub Pint Race returns

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Following the success of the inaugural Western Alzheimers Pub Pint Race at the October Galway Races, the charity race is back for the summer festival.

The King's Head

The pub is now to Ireland what the bistro has long been to France, that is a place of reliable cooking to be found across the country. Just as the French bistro is likely to have a menu of frisée and lardon salad, some steak frites and an apple tart, so the Irish pub will offer a terrine or pate, a burger and something involving beetroot and goat's cheese to start. There will be a fish dish, probably pork belly and rib eye for mains, and a chocolate fondant, crème brûlée, and lemon tart to finish. This is all excellent. They are sturdy, trustworthy dishes, the Ronseal of restaurant food. Either they are executed well or they are not great. Either way pub food culture will always be marked by its ordinary, not its exceptional.

The Crane Bar

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This pub, which is situated on the corner of William Street West and the Small Crane, was originally known as the West End Bar. In the 1930s it was owned by Paddy and Angela (known as Alda) Smith who lived over the pub. They also owned the garage behind the pub, which Paddy managed. This was where Bell, Book and Candle bookshop is today. Mrs Smith was from Loughrea and when she and her husband retired, they sold the business to her brother Mickey Coen. He ran it until 1970 when Padraig Cummins took it over. Padraig had a business in Menlo making concrete slabs.

No need to stock up, the pubs are open after 90 years

Tomorrow, for the first time in nearly a century, Galwegians can join their fellow Irish citizens and, if they choose, head to the pub.

Galway’s best of the best

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Back by popular demand, the new edition of Georgina Campbell’s Ireland Guide - The Best of the Best, the famous “glovebox bible”, is a highly selective, independently assessed guide to the very best of Irish food and hospitality.

John Keogh’s, where people get together in the West End

Being located in Galway’s West End means that the award-winning John Keogh's is located in one of Ireland’s Top 10 Foodie Destinations as awarded by the Restaurants Association of Ireland.

Survey shows importance of pub culture to tourists

The experience of an authentic Irish pub, a live trad session, and a taste of real Irish beer and whiskey are top of tourists’ to-do lists on their visit to Ireland, but the impact of Brexit and high alcohol excise tax will hamper drinks industry growth and with it the tourism sector.

John Keogh’s The Lockkeeper named as one of Ireland’s best gastro pubs

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John Keogh's The Lockkeeper has been named as one of Ireland's best gastro pubs by Hospitality Ireland. At an awards ceremony held in Dublin on Monday October 16. It has been a season of wins for John Keogh's after being awarded the title of Best Pub Food and Best Customer Service in Connacht by the Irish Pub Awards 2017.

Oughterard pub for sale

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Breathnach's Bar & Restaurant is a very popular and long established seven day residential licensed premises in the centre of Oughterard village which has now come to the market through Mullery auctioneers.

 

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