Search Results for 'Paul Walsh'

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Galway minor footballers will look to surprise favourites Kerry

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The Galway minor footballers are strong outsiders in Sunday's All Ireland final in Croke Park (1pm) as they take on a Kerry minor team seeking an historic five-in-a-row of minor titles for the county.

O'Malley and Moran win Lady Captain's prizes

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It was another great weekend for golfers around the county last weekend and they returned some great scores.

What the so called ‘empty frame’ may have looked like...

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Last month Galway Diary explored the sham legend that grew around the so-called ‘Empty frame’ on the wall of the Lynch’s Chapel, or Lady’s chapel, in the historic St Nicholas’ Collegiate church. The late Canon George Quinn pronounced that this was the very frame in which the Bishop of Clonfert, Walter Lynch’s sacred icon of the Madonna and Child once hung, before he was forced to flee just before the arrival of Cromwell’s soldiers in April 1652.

Galway, historic towns atlas

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On Monday next, November 1st, President Michael D. Higgins will launch the latest title in a series of Historic Towns Atlases of Ireland. This one is on Galway and is compiled by Jacinta Prunty and Paul Walsh. It is essentially an illustrated history of the development of the built up area of the city as seen through 57 illustrations starting with the earliest printed maps of Galway, antiquarian prints, 19th century paintings and photographs. Many of these are in colour, and many are A3 in size.

GALWAY c1200 to c1900

The above is the title of a newly published folding map by the Royal Irish Academy. It has been compiled by Jacinta Prunty and Paul Walsh using the extensive topographical information which they collected while working on a forthcoming book entitled Galway in the Historic Towns Atlas series. They also studied old maps of the city. This map extends from Newcastle Road to College Road and from Terryland to Nimmo’s Pier. The map and its extensive indices are unrivalled in their detail and afford a unique window into the earlier medieval topography and way of life in the city.

 

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