Search Results for 'National Museum of Ireland'

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Aran jumper chosen as one of world’s most iconic fashion designs for new exhibition in New York

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An Aran jumper from the National Museum of Ireland - Country Life, at Turlough Park, Castlebar, is set to feature in a major new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, opening this autumn to explore 111 of the most iconic fashion garments and accessories over the last century.

Lohan in drive to brings historic prints home to Galway

City councillor Mark Lohan is working with the City Heritage Officer and the National Museum of Ireland to bring 17 early 20th century prints of Menlo and Coolough villages back to Galway. The artworks are currently held in storage in the Museum of Country Life in Mayo and agreement is being made to commission copies and have the collection permanently displayed in Galway City.

Mayo through Jack Leonard’s lense

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'The Men of the West', that iconic photograph of Michael Kilroy's flying column taken with only the aid of natural light on the southern slopes of Nephin at 11.45pm on the longest day of the year in 1921, is known to us all. It hangs in numerous Mayo pubs and homes and thanks to the quality of the conditions and the skill of the photographer, we can clearly see the resolute expressions of the young men, we know their names and know their stories. But what of the photographer himself? What of the man who captured this first ever photo of an IRA unit on active service in Ireland? Jack Leonard did not just happen upon Kilroy and his men that bright June night. He was no amateur photographer, and neither was he a bystander during his country's fight for freedom. With a keen sense of duty, Leonard used his talent to capture all aspects of Mayo life in the early twentieth century. Jack 'JJ' Leonard was born in 1882 in Crossmolina and as a young man he trained in journalism and photography in London. He returned to Ireland in 1906 to set up his photography business at a time when the country was in political flux. Emotions and anger remained after the Land War in Mayo, a period of civil unrest and violence in the late 1800s, and the methods of parliamentary nationalists were now being challenged by physical force republicans. 

Celebrate our maritime heritage this summer

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Off the longest county coastline in Ireland, around scores of islands, as many lakes and along 100 rivers, the inhabitants of Mayo have taken to their boats and exploited our county's waterways in a sustainable manner for hundreds of years. That strong heritage is etched on our crest and is alive and celebrated today. Irish traditional boats in general took on distinctive regional characteristics and the designs of crafts were shaped by purpose, available materials and historical circumstances. Because of our geographical size, Mayo has been a focus of academics studying our many contributions to traditional boat typology.

Team of Mayo artists craft a living ‘outdoor room’ in museum woodland

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A striking new willow structure made by a group of Mayo artists is wowing visitors at the National Museum of Ireland – Country Life, Turlough Park, Castlebar, following its official unveiling last week. Teach Saileach/Willow House is a large bee-hive shaped ‘outdoor room’, woven from living willow and other natural materials using traditional skills. It forms an impressive new woodland structure for museum visitors to explore and will also be used as an outdoor classroom for education programmes.

New Mayo touring trail will explore six thousand years of heritage and culture

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Route Millennia Mayo, a new tourism trail which promotes six of the county’s premier cultural sites, was launched this week in the Jackie Clarke Collection, Pearse Steet, Ballina.

Mayo through Jack Leonard’s lens

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'The Men of the West', that iconic photograph of Michael Kilroy's flying column taken with only the aid of natural light on the southern slopes of Nephin at 11.45pm on the longest day of the year in 1921, is known to us all. It hangs in numerous Mayo pubs and homes and thanks to the quality of the conditions and the skill of the photographer, we can clearly see the resolute expressions of the young men, we know their names and know their stories. But what of the photographer himself? What of the man who captured this first ever photo of an IRA unit on active service in Ireland? Jack Leonard did not just happen upon Kilroy and his men that bright June night. He was no amateur photographer, and neither was he a bystander during his country's fight for freedom. With a keen sense of duty, Leonard used his talent to capture all aspects of Mayo life in the early twentieth century. Jack 'JJ' Leonard was born in 1882 in Crossmolina and as a young man he trained in journalism and photography in London. He returned to Ireland in 1906 to set up his photography business at a time when the country was in political flux. Emotions and anger remained after the Land War in Mayo, a period of civil unrest and violence in the late 1800s, and the methods of parliamentary nationalists were now being challenged by physical force republicans.

Belt up for a brilliant month of Bealtaine events

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Age and Opportunity has announced an exciting line-up of Mayo-based events which will take place during the month of May as part of Bealtaine 2017, Ireland's annual festival of creativity as we age. Now in its 22nd year, Bealtaine continues to be embraced by the Mayo community with many arts and cultural events organised by local libraries, arts centres, care settings, galleries, active retirement groups, and community groups across the county. This year’s theme, All together now, will stage major events in Mayo.

'Shelter’ project has lots of life at the National Museum of Ireland

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An environmentally minded art project that is full of life is getting under way this May at the National Museum of Ireland, Turlough Park, Castlebar. A group of artists from across Mayo are to spend six weeks creating a ‘living shelter’ in the historic grounds of Turlough Park House.

Magic of St Patrick brought to life at free storytelling event

The magic, feats, and adventures of one of the world’s most famous saints will be brought to life at a free family event on Saturday, at the National Museum of Ireland - Country Life. Award-winning storyteller Rab Fulton will be at the museum at Turlough Park, Castlebar, to deliver two captivating storytelling performances celebrating St Patrick, at 11.30am and 2pm.

 

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