Search Results for 'Military organization'

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Gregory grandson reads ‘An Irish Airman’ at RAF centenary celebration

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A great grandson of Galway's World War I fighter ace Major Robert Gregory, Robin Murray Brown, read WB Yeats' famous poem An Irish Airman Foresees His Death in Belfast last Sunday. St Anne's Cathedral was filled to capacity for a service to commemorate the centenary of the Royal Air Force (RAF), which succeeded the Royal Flying Corps in which Major Gregory flew. Major Gregory joined the war effort in 1916 and was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry. He was also awarded the Legion d’Honneur — France’s highest honour.

An Irish Airman

Week VI

Be prepared for flat battery problems

Drivers are being advised to check their car batteries and tyres as we wade in to the New Year.

Coast Guard in early morning rescue off Mayo coast

The Coast Guard was called to evacuate an injured crewman from a vessel off the Mayo coast early yesterday.

Mayo native and NUI Galway doctorate holder named new Chief of Staff

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A Mayoman who completed a PhD in Political Science in NUI Galway six years ago was this week named as the new Chief of Staff of the Irish Defence Forces.

Mayo man to take up top post in Defence Forces

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Castlebar native Rear Admiral Mark Mellett was announced this week as the new Chief of Staff of the Defence Forces.

Pomp and circumstance, and one unmarked grave

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On June 12 1922 a very special ceremony took place at Windsor Castle, near London. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State the previous December, five Irish regiments, including the Connaught Rangers, the Royal Irish, the Leinsters, the Munsters, and the Dublin Fusiliers, which had served the British army with exceptional valour at times, were disbanded. It was a day of special significance for both the participants and onlookers.

Two new recruits for the Connaught Rangers

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This very fine painting ‘Listed for the Connaught Rangers, recruiting in Ireland 1878’, was painted by Elizabeth S Thompson, but following her marriage to Lieutenant General Sir William Butler of Bansha Castle, Co Tipperary, is best known as Lady Butler. It is not only extremely unusual for a woman artist to have so successfully worked in the highly masculine field of military art, but Lady Butler was an exception in many ways. She was an innovator, particularly in her sensitive and humane depiction of the ordinary soldier. Detail was all important. She was a regular visitor to Chelsea Hospital, and other retirement homes for soldiers, to question survivors, sometimes getting them to re-enact a particular scene.

Two boys from Loughrea

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At the beginning of the last century, two boys grew up together in Loughrea. Socially they were far apart, but they were great friends. John Oliver was from a particularly poor background. His family lived in a tiny lean-to shack out on the Galway road on the edge of the town. His friend was Tom Wall, who lived in a comfortable house on Patrick Street. John enjoyed visiting their home.  His friend played with a band, The Saharas, and there was often music and fun in their house, shared by his brother Ray, and their attractive sister Cissie.

Mexican-Irish hero to be honoured in Clifden

A Clifden man, who was one of the founding-members of the San Patricio Brigade of the Mexican army, is to have a Sinn Féin cumann named after him.

 

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