Search Results for 'Law and economics'

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Big demand for city rentals but it is not a bed of roses for landlords

There has been a noticeable increase in demand for rental properties in Galway of late, compounded by additional property buyers being held back by restrictive bank lending, increasing employment, and the general increase in population. According to local property letting agents, there has been a ‘surprise spike’ in queries in recent months, and rental properties are being snapped up within days of becoming available. They expect that rising demand for rental properties will continue for the foreseeable future but caution that it can still be a tough business.

‘Explosive’ housing shortage predicted

Westmeath’s councillors see housing as the biggest challenge for 2014, with one councillor predicting a housing shortage as “an explosion that’s about to happen”.

Housing chair fears rise in homelessness in 2014

The chairman of Westmeath’s Housing SPC says his greatest fear for 2014 is that people on the housing list won’t be able to access accommodation on the Rental Accommodation Scheme.

A royal visitor in ‘Pollok’s Time’

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Earlier this year Galway Diary discussed the evictions implemented by Marcella Netterville and John Gerrard on their 7,000 acre estate at Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. In 1846 more that 400 families were heartlessly thrown out on the road, without any compensation. The land was being cleared to fatten cattle, which would have been far more profitable than tenants; many of whom, as the Great Famine tightened its terrible grip, were unable to pay their way. The Times of London famously commented that the Ballinlass evictions showed ‘the sublime indifference to social considerations of which no one but an Irish landowner is capable.’

Average rent paid in Mayo per month is less than €550

The Private Residential Tenancy Board (PRTB) has published the most accurate and authoritative rent report of its kind on the private accommodation sector in Ireland. Compiled by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), and based on the PRTB’s own register of more than 277,000 private tenancies throughout the State, it reveals the actual rents being paid for rented properties, as distinct from the asking rent which features in other rent reports published by other parties.

What more could a landlord do?

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Despite some honourable exceptions the conduct of most Galway landowners to their tenants during the latter part of the 19th century was a disgrace. It led to disastrous social consequences. Although ultimately, the landed class were removed from their houses and lands, as a result of the Land War and acts of parliament; in many cases the peasantry too was decimated, demoralised and scattered to the winds.

What more could a landlord do?

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Despite some honourable exceptions the conduct of most Galway landowners to their tenants during the latter part of the 19th century was a disgrace. It led to disastrous social consequences. Although ultimately, the landed class were removed from their houses and lands, as a result of the Land War and acts of parliament; in many cases the peasantry too was decimated, demoralised and scattered to the winds.

Let West Coast Property Management let out your property

West Coast Property Management, is a family-owned and operated business, with extensive experience in the Galway housing and apartment rental market, whose primary purpose is to rent out a property fast and efficiently to tenants who have been carefully vetted.

Changes to Landlord and Tenant Law welcomed

Castlebar Fine Gael town councillor Noreen Heston has warmly welcomed the publication by Minister Jan O’Sullivan of legislation to reform landlord and tenant law.

The case of the Craughwell Prisoners

In the 1880s the Land War was at its height. It was a prolonged period of bitter civic unrest which pitted an unprotected peasantry against some ruthless landlords, who had the law and power of eviction at their disposal. Following the Great Famine a weakened tenant peasantry was easily removed from the land. It began a pitiful trail to the workhouse, and the emigrant ships. But as the century progressed the situation changed. The highly organised Irish National Land League supported evicted farmers; while members of the Irish Parliamentary Party in Westminster fought for legislation which would eventually see a redistribution of land to tenants.

 

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