Search Results for 'Landlord–tenant law'

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Maintenance standards required for exterior of rental properties, says Nolan

Galway West TD Derek Nolan has called for a set of standards to be put in place to ensure that the exterior of rental properties across the city are maintained to an appropriate standard.

Mayo rents increase slightly

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Rents may be increasing sharply in Dublin but that is not the situation in the Mayo private rental market.

Average rent in Westmeath hits €537 a month

The average rent for all dwellings let in County Westmeath in Q4 2014, and which were registered with the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB), was €537. That was down €2 when compared to the prevailing average rent in Q4 2013, when the amount was €539.

The gathering storm

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The threat of another famine in 1879, within living memory of the horror and catastrophe of the Great Famine some 29 years earlier, brought renewed terror to the vulnerable tenant farmers in the west of Ireland. This time it was not just the humble potato, but severe weather conditions which devastated crops and feed stuffs over a three year period. Farm incomes dropped dramatically, landlords fussed that rents would not be paid. Whereas some landlords were patient, others warned that evictions would follow if rents were not paid on time.

‘The people are mightier than a lord’

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Week III

Big demand for city rental accommodation but it is not all a bed of roses for landlords

There has been a noticeable increase in demand for rental properties in Galway of late, compounded by additional property buyers being held back by restrictive bank lending, increasing employment, and a general increase in population. According to local property letting agents, there has been a ‘surprise spike’ in queries in recent months, and rental properties are being snapped up within days of becoming available, and they expect that rising demand for rental properties will continue for the foreseeable future but caution that it can still be a tough business.

Big demand for city rentals but it is not a bed of roses for landlords

There has been a noticeable increase in demand for rental properties in Galway of late, compounded by additional property buyers being held back by restrictive bank lending, increasing employment, and the general increase in population. According to local property letting agents, there has been a ‘surprise spike’ in queries in recent months, and rental properties are being snapped up within days of becoming available. They expect that rising demand for rental properties will continue for the foreseeable future but caution that it can still be a tough business.

Housing chair fears rise in homelessness in 2014

The chairman of Westmeath’s Housing SPC says his greatest fear for 2014 is that people on the housing list won’t be able to access accommodation on the Rental Accommodation Scheme.

A royal visitor in ‘Pollok’s Time’

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Earlier this year Galway Diary discussed the evictions implemented by Marcella Netterville and John Gerrard on their 7,000 acre estate at Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. In 1846 more that 400 families were heartlessly thrown out on the road, without any compensation. The land was being cleared to fatten cattle, which would have been far more profitable than tenants; many of whom, as the Great Famine tightened its terrible grip, were unable to pay their way. The Times of London famously commented that the Ballinlass evictions showed ‘the sublime indifference to social considerations of which no one but an Irish landowner is capable.’

The heartless evictions from the Gerrard estate, 1846

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Friday March 13 1846 turned out to be a very unlucky day for the 447 tenants on the Gerrard estate in the townland of Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. Shortly after dawn the sheriff, accompanied by a large force of the 49th Regiment under the command of Captain Browne, and an equally large detachment of police, arrived at ‘the place marked out for destruction.’ Despite the vehement protestations of the people, and their insistence that they had their rent money ready for payment, and that their repeated efforts to pay their rent was refused, the soldiers and police began systematically to demolish their homes, 67 in number. *

 

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