Search Results for 'James Joyce'

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Justice at last for the Indian Empire incident?

Despite the excitement, the prospects, the agreement to carry mail, and new luxury ships, the Galway transatlantic adventure headed by J. Orwell Lever ended in failure within six years.

Autumn Gathering offers a chance to learn more of our literary heritage

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The Easter Rising of 1916 has been described as an act of theatre; it has been called, more romantically, a poets’ rebellion.

Fr Peter Daly - ‘The warmest expression of our unbounded gratitude.’

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Described as a ‘turbulent priest’, and ‘the dominant public figure in Galway during the 1850s’, who was ‘a stubborn, abrasive, guileful and egotistical populist,’* Fr Peter Daly was the principle mover and shaker behind Galway’s drive to become the main transatlantic port for traffic to America in the 1850s. As chairman of both the Town Commissioners and the Harbour Board, he supported J O Lever’s Galway Line, which was to run three state-of-the-art steam-sailing ships between Galway and New York, from a grandiose harbour to be built off Furbo. Passengers from Britain, and all over Ireland, would be delivered to the terminal by train. It was to be the most comfortable, and shortest, route to America.

Did a midsummer murder silence a guilty pilot?

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In June 1858 Galway town was in a fever of excitement. Its vision for a magnificent transatlantic port off Furbo, reaching deep into in Galway Bay, where passangers from Britain, and throughout the island of Ireland, would be brought to their emigration ship in the comfort of a train, could now be scuppered by the apparent carelessness of the two local pilots.

Did Liverpool scuttle Galway’s Atlantic dream?

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If Eamon Bradshaw and his crew think their courageous plan to extend Galway harbour into deep water to accommodate cruise liners is a step into modernity that will bring commercial success to the city on a grand scale, it pales almost into insignificance compared to the stunning ambitions the Galway merchants schemed in the mid 19th century.

The west of Ireland lacks civilisation - But it has poetry

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‘The capital, Galway, is a terrible place. It has of course St Nicholas, one of the few remaining pre-Reformation churches; the frontispiece of a Renaissance town house erected as a gateway to the public park; and a medieval fortified house about which they tell the well-known story of the Lynch who hanged his own son when the sheriff wasn't available. At least once a year while I was director of the Abbey theatre we got a play on that. From Miss Edgeworth's account of her travels to Galway it would appear that as a theme for tragedy it was popular a hundred years ago. But even before that I had a lively hatred of the town....'

New book explores Galway's influence on James Joyce

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"MY WIFE is from Galway city," James Joyce told a London literary agent in 1918 when his writings began to attract international attention, and that woman and Galway had a major impact on the Dubliner.

New multilingual phone app puts Galway’s history in your pocket

A new app launched in the city this week brings Galway’s history right up to date with a self-paced interactive tour of the city, featuring stories about local landmarks and famous characters from Galway’s past.

Dying for Home Rule

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Here are two pictures from my father’s head

‘The face and voice of the coming revolution’

Week IV

 

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