Search Results for 'Irish coast'

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New Aran ferry to sail from France to Ireland this weekend

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Tourism to the Aran Islands is set for a major boost next Tuesday morning as the largest, fastest, and most environmentally friendly cruise vessel every to break waves at Doolin makes its much-anticipated arrival.

Boost for tourism on Aran Islands as €3m custom built cruise ship on the way this summer

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Accessing Ireland’s most popular off-shore destination, the Aran Islands, by sea is to become more comfortable, faster and environmentally friendly thanks to a record investment by one of the best known sea faring families on the West coast.

From skullduggery to a fishing industry

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We know very little about manmade piers and quays along the western seaboard before the beginning of the 19th century, when a lavish programme of safe harbours were built not only to encourage fishing, but as relief programmes in times of distress. It was also an attempt to replace the activities of piracy and smuggling with an industry based on the believed bounty from the sea.

Dancing along Ireland's coastline

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"A MULTI-layered meditation on overcoming the constant force of gravity, and the fear of falling, in order to achieve the joyous freedom of the peak” is how Irish Theatre Magazine described The Cove.

The siege of Blackrock Lighthouse

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Fifteen kilometres southwest of Mayo's Mullet Peninsula, beyond the pillars of the Inishkea and Duvillaun islands, lies the isolated island of Blackrock. Appearing on the horizon like an abandoned vessel, this small, rocky, outcrop has been without a permanent resident for many decades, but the sound of the crashing waves and the constant coating of spray is a reminder of the horror that almost claimed the lives of three men in the winter of 1942-43 when the rock became the scene of a prolonged and frightening wartime siege.

Galway’s streets ‘are full of Confederates’

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Despite the challenges, dangers, bankruptcies, and in some cases, exploitation, by the mid 19th century Galway had a small but profitable fleet of sailing ships. In previous weeks I have outlined some of the achievements and failures of the Galway Line, which between 1858 and 1864 completed a total of 55 trouble free return voyages to New York and Boston. One of its ships, the Circassian, which I discussed last week, sailed from Galway on September 21 1859 to New York with 342 passengers of whom 108 were first class. One hundred and seventy persons who applied for passage were turned away as the ship was full.

Buoyant mood at inaugural Ballyconneely Bay swim

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A handful of brave swimmers took to the choppy waters in Bunowen Pier, Ballyconneely, last weekend to raise funds for a local primary school.

Mayo RNLI stations take part in Easter 1916 centenary commemoration

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Lifeboat crews from Achill RNLI and Ballyglass RNLI took part in the Easter Sunday 1916 centenary commemoration which saw some 700 members of the Irish emergency services taking part in the State parade. Ballyglass RNLI coxswain John Walsh and Achill RNLI second coxswain Dave Curtis joined 50 of the charity’s volunteers and staff who came from lifeboat stations around the Irish coast and inland to parade through Dublin city centre to mark the centenary of the Easter Rising. Dave Curtis carried the RNLI’s flag for the charity in the parade.

Heart transplant recipient comes full circle following 2500km charity trek from Salthill

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Three months after setting off from the ‘Circle of Life’ memorial garden in Salthill on an incredible 2500km walk around the Irish coast raising funds and awareness for the Irish Heart and Lung Transplant Association (IHLTA), this weekend foster carer and heart transplant recipient Ron Cummins successfully made it back to the special spot where his walk started.

 

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