Search Results for 'Great Southern Hotel'

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Dara Calleary TD named Retail Advocate of the Year

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A Mayo TD has been recognised for his work advocating on behalf of the retail industry, at the recent Retail Excellence Awards Night held in Dublin.

Gaslight at The Meyrick

The Meyrick has long had a special place in the hearts of the people of Galway. Known as the Railway Hotel when it opened in 1852, and later as the Great Southern Hotel, this stately showpiece looms large over Eyre Square. In 2006 it was renamed the Hotel Meyrick in order to maintain a link to its historical background, as Eyre Square was once named Meyrick Square. The hotel then underwent a refurbishment programme intended to reinstate the grandeur and elegance of its 19th century heyday, marble flooring, high ceilings, chandeliers and rich fabrics all contribute to re-creating the grandeur of old.

Part of Forster Street, 1905

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This photograph, taken from an old glass slide, shows some important personage in an escorted carriage leaving the Great Southern Hotel. There are some mounted liveried gentlemen in front and two RIC men on horseback behind the carriage, which is hidden by the RIC men. You can see a policeman on foot to the right of our picture.

Kenny’s Gallery celebrates eight decades of Galway Art Club

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ONE OF Galway’s most venerable arts groups is celebrated in Kenny’s Gallery from next week, when the venue hosts a large scale exhibition saluting 80 years of Galway Art Club.

Feel the pulse of Galway by staying at Hotel Meyrick

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When you want to go to a city, you really want to go into the city, to go to the heart of it, to feel its beat, its laconic mornings where you can watch it come to light; its heartbeat quickening as its workers go to work, so that you can feel you’re more on holiday by virtue of the fact that others are not. To truly appreciate a city, it is welcome to find a hotel that brings you right into the centre, where for the duration of your stay, you are truly part of the place.

Feel the pulse of Galway by staying at Hotel Meyrick

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When you want to go to a city, you really want to go into the city, to go to the heart of it, to feel its beat, its laconic mornings where you can watch it come to light; its heartbeat quickening as its workers go to work, so that you can feel you’re more on holiday by virtue of the fact that others are not. To truly appreciate a city, it is welcome to find a hotel that brings you right into the centre, where for the duration of your stay, you are truly part of the place.

A letter sent to GA Hayes-McCoy

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One hundred years ago there were a series of truly terrible battles on the Western Front which were watched anxiously in Ireland as elsewhere. On June 7, near the Belgian village of Messines, the Allied army won a substantial victory. It gave hope, which turned out to be tragically false, that perhaps this was the beginning of the end of the war. With the capture of the Messines ridge, the Allies were confident they could clear a path all the way down to Passchendaele, and capture the Belgian coast up the Dutch border.

'The west end is a lovely area, like a village in the middle of the city'

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One of Galway’s best loved businesses is Ernie’s Fruit and Veg in Sea Road, which has been a central fixture in the west end community for more than 40 years. The shop was founded and is still run by Ernie Deacy, ably assisted by his son Ernest jr and daughter Annemarie, while his other son, Paul, owns Bell, Book and Candle just around the corner.

Galway native Gerald Lawless to be honoured for his work for Irish diaspora

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Galway native Gerald Lawless is to be rewarded for his sterling work for his contribution toward the Irish diaspora worldwide when he receives the Presidential Distinguished Service Award for the Irish Abroad for 2016.

The boy who found the Galway balloon

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Forty years ago, the world was a simpler place. What we did as fun was different. The world seemed a bigger and more wondrous place, beyond the reach of many of us.

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