Search Results for 'Eglinton Hotel'

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New book on Salthill tells the tale of one of Ireland’s first tourist resorts

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Paul McGinley’s new book, Salthill - A History, Part 1, begins with a most informative historic timeline, taking the reader from 1557 to 1901. Early documents were sparse but in 1797, a French traveller “wrote of young damsels going to refresh their charms in the sea about two miles from the city”.

How World War I changed Galway’s horsepower

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Salthill began to really liven up with the arrival of the Dublin to Galway train in 1851. Holidaymakers arrived at the resort in some style. Trains were met at the station by horse-drawn ‘cars’ or ‘buses’ which went out directly to the seaside.

Looking west on Shop Street, c120 years ago

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The first thing you notice about this image is the state of the street surface with its animal droppings and puddles. You had to be careful crossing the street, which is why they laid down cobbles between footpaths, you can see them at the entrance to Church Lane and Churchyard Street.

The world on your plate at One World Tapestry

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Asylum seekers and their children have spent years living in an institutional setting that was designed as a short-term solution. They are accommodated by the State in residential institutions, under a reception system known as Direct Provision. Direct Provision is intended to provide for the welfare of asylum seekers and their families as they await decisions on their asylum application. It ‘directly provides’ essential services, medical care, accommodation, and board with three meals a day provided at set times. When the the system was established in 2000, it was described as an interim solution to the high numbers of asylum seekers entering the State in search of protection, and the growing concerns about the risk of homelessness for that population. More than 15 years later, little has changed in the physical conditions, supports, or treatment of asylum seekers while they remain in these centres.

A brief history of Galway trams and buses

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An entrepreneur named Mr Berry was probably one of the first people to organise buses in Galway. He had over a dozen horse drawn vehicles that plied regularly between Eyre Square and the Eglinton Hotel. The fare was one penny. Each vehicle was marked to carry a certain number of people and the police were vigilant to see that there was no overloading. In 1868 he bought a new bus that was allowed to carry inside and outside passengers. This could travel on longer excursions, to Barna and Oughterard, etc, but an accident on Knockbane Hill seriously affected his business.

Big demands, wasteful spending, and what about Salthill?

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AS WE move into Galway's version of the ‘Silly Season’, where the commentariat find it difficult to talk about anything other than the Races or the arts festival, it was an opportunity that simply could not be missed for a couple of our more industrious city councillors.

 

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