Search Results for 'Eglinton Canal'

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NUI Galway launches biodiversity trail to showcase its natural habitats

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NUI Galway has launched a new biodiversity trail highlighting the rich variety of animal and plant life on the campus.

The dredging of the river

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The main channel discharging all the water from loughs Corrib and Mask is the Galway River, flowing from Lough Corrib through the city to the sea. Among the structures built in 1850 and the following years, during the course of a drainage scheme carried out by what was then known as The Board of Public Works in Ireland, was the main regulating weir across the Corrib at Waterside. Its function was to control the river level at Galway in the interests of draining, milling, and navigation. It was built at a point in the river where the water descended though rapids.

City council hits back at claims Eglinton Canal works are destroying area's biodiversity

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Claims that works being carried out on the Eglinton Canal are destroying the biodiversity of the region, are being carried out without consultation, and are in effect, a redevelopment of the canal, have been dismissed as incorrect by the Galway City Council.

Remembering Devon Place from afar

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SHEILAH MORRIS (now Cangley) was born in Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) in 1928. Her father, who was born in Galway, had been recruited in London in 1920 to join the Veterinary Department of the Civil Service in Northern Rhodesia. He married a Galway girl, and they both moved to Mazabuka, where he worked at a veterinary research station. Now in her eighties and living in Australia, Sheilah recalls her childhood memories of Galway in the 1930s.

Galway’s Corrib Canal and NUI Galway to feature in RTÉ documentary series

The final episode of the current popular TV documentary series, Building Ireland, will look at the Corrib navigation system and its canals, which aspired to transform Galway into a major industrial hub, as well as looking at how the National University of Ireland, Galway, came to be located in the city. The episode will air at 8.30pm on RTÉ One tomorrow (Friday) , and will be the final episode in the six-part series.

John Keogh’s, it’s a keeper

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To my mind, there are three levels of food in Irish pubs. At one end is the traditional pub, where your only dining decision is whether to have the cheese and onion or salt and vinegar. And then there is proper pub grub, comforting soups, tasty sandwiches, and old favourites like bangers and mash or lasagne, usually in overly generous portions. At the other extreme of the scale are the ones who take themselves very seriously, where you can expect such delights as 'roasted marrow bones with curried clams in a grilled octopus reduction'.

The Eglinton Canal

One hundred and sixty eight years ago this week, on March 8, work started on the cutting of what we know as the Eglinton Canal. There had been previous attempts to open a passage from the river to the sea. As far back as 1498, the then mayor had a plan to connect the Sandy River with Lough Athalia. It was Alexander Nimmo who first mooted the idea of a canal in 1822. If steamboats could travel from the docks to the Corrib, it would greatly enhance the commercial importance of the city and a valuable connection with the hinterland would be established. His original plan was that this connection would start at the top of Woodquay, where McSwiggan’s is today, go along Eglinton Street and down the west side of Eyre Square to the docks. The cost proved to be prohibitive and there were a lot of objections from people who owned land or a business along the route.

Galway regains its ‘clean’ rating in latest IBAL litter survey

Galway has shown a noticeable improvement in tackling litter in the final Irish Business Against Litter survey of 2015, published this week. The city was found to be clean to European norms, and ranked joint 25th among 40 towns and cities surveyed.

 

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