Search Results for 'Dutch government'

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Dealing with whatever the ocean sends

It is not surprising that any child with imagination, and an interest in the sea, would spend time at the city’s harbour watching the ships come and go, and the men who worked there as they talked and unloaded fish or cargo. As a child Kathleen Curran, once the home chores were done, would run down the back paths from her home on College Road and along Lough Atalia to the docks. ‘There she would stand and gaze in wonder at the ships, boats and trawlers, hookers and gleoteóigs tied up or coming and going about their business.’

Making it in the global village

The CAO online application system has just recently opened, bringing many students to that critical juncture regarding decisions about their life path. Those who are considering apprenticeships, post Leaving Cert courses (PLCs), private colleges, and gap years still have time to mull over their options while they prepare for exams. Students who are seeking to enter programmes in a wide range of disciplines, in systems where entry requirements are low, need to make those big decisions soon.

Many west of Ireland students choosing Dutch universities

There are currently more than 1,000 Irish students registered on degree programmes, taught through English, in Dutch universities, a number that has nearly doubled in recent years.

Galway volunteers arm refugees with coding skills for a better future

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The biggest humanitarian crisis since the aftermath of World War Two has led to an exodus of five million people from Syria since 2012. In an effort to help refugees living within the Middle East, a small number of individuals from Galway in February 2016 became part of an ambitious digital learning programme designed to bring computer coding skills to thousands of children, teenagers and teachers living in camps and districts across the region. Known as Refugee Code Week (RCW) the initiative, led by the German software corporation SAP in partnership with the United Nations Refugee Agency(UNHCR) and the Galway Education Centre, has developed course content and provided teams of IT volunteers from across three continents to upskill teachers from Syria and other Middle Eastern countries in delivering coding programmes to young refugees and the youth of host nations from eight years to twenty years of age. The Galway volunteers taking part in the programme are Bernard Kirk, director of the Galway Education Centre and co-founder of RCW, Nuala Allen (SAP in Parkmore), Niall McCormick (Colmac Robotics) and Brendan Smith (NUI Galway). BRENDAN SMITH, who has through his Outreach projects at the university since 2004 worked with asylum seekers in Ireland, was seconded from the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at NUI Galway to become a master instructor in RCW as well as in a sister programme, namely the highly successful Africa Code Week that has been operating since June 2015. Here is his story.

Galway volunteers provide refugees with coding skills for a better future

The Middle East has experienced unimaginable devastation since the 2003 invasion of Iraq. As in all wars, civilians are the innocent victims. In what was once one of the most modern countries in the region, it is estimated that 470,000 inhabitants have died since 2011, over 7.6 millions are internally displaced within Syria and over five million were forced to leave.

 

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