Search Results for 'Dick Byrne'

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'I was a working class boy'

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One of the notable shows in this year’s Galway International Arts Festival is Maum at An Taibhdhearc, starring David Heap, who is best known for his role in Fair City. The play is based on a true story, this compelling new drama dares to uncover little known facts about a case that is still clothed in secrets and shame.

Cúirt Fringe to remember Nora Crubs - “Galway’s first nightclub”

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NORA CRUBS, a one time Quay Street venue, described by some as “Galway’s first nightclub” will be remembered and celebrated at an event at the Cúirt Fringe next week.

Remembering Foggy Spelman

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Paschal Spelman may have been given that name at birth, but to the many thousands of people (especially old Galwegians) he entertained down the years, he was simply known as ‘Foggy’.

MacLiammóir’s magic captivates an innocent Galway

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Geraldine Neeson, whose family kept theatre people when they visited Cork, described Mícheál MacLiammóir ‘as beautiful as a young god’, and his companion Hilton Edwards as a man endowed ‘with exuberant spirit and all-embracing gestures,’ diplomatically hinting that perhaps he was somewhat less prepossessing.

Taibhdhearc Na Gaillimhe

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The history of theatre in Ireland goes back to the start of the 17th century. The beginning of the 20th century saw the emergence of plays written in Irish and that movement was given a significant boost with the opening of An Taibhdhearc on August 27, 1928. It is the oldest operational theatre in Galway and is Ireland’s National Irish Language Theatre. The title is made up of two Irish words, taibh meaning ‘spectacle or ghost’ and dearc meaning ‘behold’.

New eBook from Dick Byrne

A NEW book from the Galway author, playwright, and personality Dick Byrne, My Love Is On The Wind, is now available from Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing store.

Running a city on village lines

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This photograph of a pig fair was taken about 100 years ago on a wet day at the top of Eyre Square. The corner we see on the right was occupied by Michael Walsh, family grocer, wine and spirit merchant, who claimed to have the most superior quality of goods always kept in stock... “A trial will convince”. In the foreground are a typical group of farmers who have travelled into town with their tall carts carrying their pigs. They have them on show with a rope tied around each animal’s leg to avoid them running all over the place. You can almost sense these farmers praying for a buyer to come along, because if they did not sell they would have to bring their pigs home again. Not all farmers had the luxury of carts, and those who walked their animals into town and did not sell, would have to walk them home again.

Pubs can flout the law as existing ‘after hours’ legislation not in Irish

Charges against two publicans in Claremorris for having people on their premises after hours, were dismissed at Claremorris District Court this week, when it was revealed that the relevant legislation for the prosecutions being brought had not being translated into Irish. This was despite the fact that the first piece of legislation, which these prosecutions were brought under, was enacted as far back as 2000.

Fresh herrings, scibs, and red petticoats

This photograph of a very animated open air fish market was taken about 100 years ago, and shows lots of creels, scibs, various types of basket, a wondrous variety of patterned shawls, petticoats, and práiscíns. There seems to be more selling than buying. It must have been very colourful and competitive… just imagine them all calling out, in lovely Galway accents, “Fresh herrings”, “Johnny Dory”, etc.

Forty years of Highfield Park

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The area we know today as Highfield Park was originally a place of green fields and rocky granite outcrops and it was ‘out in the country’. There were very few people living there. Mostly situated in the townland of Rahoon (Rath Ún or Ún’s Fort), it was bordered by two of the main roads into Galway, the Taylor’s Hill road and the Rahoon road. There was a small granite quarry there, (near the grounds of St Helen’s) and a couple of stone turrets which probably served as watchtowers.

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