Search Results for 'Collegiate Church'

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History made for local Church of Ireland community as St Nicholas’ gets its first female rector

St Nicholas’s Collegiate church has seen many changes in the city over the hundreds of years it has stood guard over the street, but is about to experience a new one with the announcement this week that its new rector will be the first female to hold the post.

St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church, 1823

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This drawing of the Collegiate Church was done in December 1823 (at about 2pm according to the clock) by EW Thompson. It was presented to the vestry by another EW Thompson of Tullymore, Broughshane, Co Antrim, in 1947.

The enduring legend of the Irish Madonna of Hungary

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An extraordinary thing happened in the Hungarian city of Gyor on St Patrick’s Day, March 17 1697. A painting of the Virgin and Child, brought to the city 42 years previously by Bishop Walter Lynch, a member of the esteemed Lynch family of Galway, began to ‘weep copiously’ during Mass. Despite having been wiped clean with linen cloths (one of those cloths is still preserved), it continued to exude ‘a bloody sweat’ for three hours.

The Collegiate Church

The Collegiate Church of St Nicholas of Myra is the largest medieval parish church in Ireland and its history is a kind of microcosm of the history of Galway. The earliest part of the present church dates from the beginning of the 14th century and includes the chancel with its three windows in the south wall. However it is possible that there was an earlier structure on the site. There is a legend that a man from the Aran Islands who died in 1580 aged 220 years could remember a time when the church did not exist but that just sounds a likely story. The records that exist suggest that the church was founded in or about the year 1320.

The Proclamation Of King George V

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“The accession of His Majesty King George V was proclaimed in Galway at 2 o’clock on Saturday (21st of May, 1910). The ceremony was performed by the High Sherriff, Mr. Cecil R. Henry, and took place opposite the Courthouse. On the steps of the building there was a fashionable gathering. Outside the hollow square formed by soldiers and police, the crowd was one of immense proportions. About one hundred men of the Connaught Rangers, with their band and the King’s colour, under Major Sarsfield, were formed up in line opposite the Courthouse, and an equal number of the Royal Irish Constabulary, drawn from Galway and outside stations, filled up the remaining sides of the square. They were in charge of Co. Inspector Flower, Districts-Inspectors Mercer and O’Rorke.

 

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