Search Results for 'Castlebar'

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Families of children with muscular dystrophy bring their fight for Translarna approval to Leinster House

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Sinn Féin Mayo senator Rose Conway-Walsh has stressed the importance of an all-Ireland approach to securing patients’ access to a life changing drug treatment. Speaking after a briefing in Leinster House at which families of Duchenne muscular dystrophy sufferers spoke of their ongoing efforts to secure access to the drug Translarna, Sen Conway-Walsh said: "As legislators, across all political persuasions we have a responsibility to join the fight of these families for access to treatment which will, as it has done in the North and 22 other countries, significantly delay the loss of walking and associated respiratory difficulties."

Castlebar Golf Club wins All Ireland Jimmy Bruen

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Castlebar Golf Club is the All Ireland Jimmy Bruen champion after a thrilling 3-2 win over Ulster Champions Warrenpoint on Saturday at Carton House. The Mayo club captained by John Kelly came through their semifinal on Friday in dramatic fashion with Tom Moylett and Mark Corrigan securing the 3-2 win with a birdie on the 19th hole play off against Munster Champions Ballykisteen.

Set dancing weekend in aid of Mayo Cancer Support

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The hugely popular annual Diamond Set Dancing Weekend in aid of Mayo Cancer Support, Rock Rose House is organised annually by Oliver Fleming who plans a weekend full of ceilis, sean nos workshops, jiving and country and western music each night.

It’s all Go in Mayo towns with new car sharing service

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A new car sharing service has been launched in Westport and Castlebar towns and plans are under way to roll out the operation to other towns across the county. GoCar, in partnership with Irish Rail, Mayo County Counciland Westport Smarter Travel has launched its car sharing service in  Mayo with the first GoCar base situated at Westport and Castlebar train stations and in both town centres.

The view from the stands and what drives on the green and red faithful

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Did you ever consider how many miles it would be to fly from Castlebar to Boston? It is very doubtful that sort of random thought came into your head. Do you follow Mayo around the country religiously to every senior game home and away? Well if you’re from Castlebar and take MacHale Park as your starting point for each of those journeys this season, then you will probably have travelled about 120 more miles than it is by air from Castlebar to Boston, by the time you get home from Sunday’s All Ireland final. Crazy as it seems, these are the lengths Mayo fans go to.

Who fears to speak of Ernie O’Malley?

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This week’s title borrows from John Kells Ingram’s famous 1843 political ballad, "The Memory of the Dead". In his poem, Ingram posits that later generations turned their fattened backs on the memory of the rebels of 1798, "Who Fears to Speak of '98?" Ingram was not a republican, but he penned his piece for the nationalist paper The Nation because he sympathised with what the United Irishmen had attempted to do and he had always pledged to defend brave men who opposed tyranny.

From the peloton....Day One

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In the first of his An Post Rás tour diaries Jason Prendergast from Team iTap brings us into the heart of stage of one of the race.

Mayo remains a rural heartland

More than 70 per cent of the population of Mayo live in rural areas, according to the latest data released by the Central Statistics Office following the Census which was taken last year.

Mayo remains a rural heartland

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More than 70 per cent of the population of Mayo live in rural areas, according to the latest data released by the Central Statistics Office following the Census which was taken last year. The CSO has reported that, of the total population of 130,507 recorded in the county, 37,276 (28.6 per cent) live in urban areas, with 99,231 (71.4 per cent) living in rural areas.

Dublin in twelve hours, and that is a promise

Through the years of kingdom, empire, dominion, republic and continental union, County Mayo has retained the rarely advantageous honour of being among the most westerly outposts of each political entity. The county's distance from the heart of government and its demanding terrain seriously hampered any mode of movement, in and out of Mayo. At the passing of the Acts of Union in 1800, the Crown accepted that responding to sporadic violent opposition to the legislation would be difficult considering a regiment on foot would take six days to travel from Dublin to the west. Correspondence between the British authorities in Dublin and their surrogates in Mayo would therefore be all the more urgent. However, at this time, it took the swift mail coach, running through the night, more than 30 hours to reach the county capital. Logistical challenges existed too for the movement of produce and for travelling men of business. Any coach journey covering 60 miles a day was considered efficient. To reach even Mayo's eastern border by coach from Dublin would have taken two days with good conditions. Land transport, at the turn of the 19th century, was undependable and slow. As a result, long distance travel on the part of most people was simply not undertaken due the many obstacles it raised. 

 

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