Search Results for 'British government'

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Tragedy in the US makes political issues pale in significance

So many dreadful things appear to be happening throughout the world now.

Connemara premiere for Murdair Mhám Trasna

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MURDAIR MHÁM Trasna, a feature length docu-drama on the slaying of a family in Connemara, and subsequent wrongful convictions and executions of innocent people, will be screened in County Galway next week.

Expect plenty political ‘seat of the pants’ moments in 2018

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Insider is still recovering from what was a dramatic end to 2017 - the State narrowly avoiding a Christmas election; Ireland being at the centre of the standoff at the end of Phase 1 of the Brexit negotiations; and locally a SF implosion in Galway West. It was a whirlwind few weeks, and a period that offered wildly contrasting fortunes for the main political players. The Christmas break was badly needed by all.

Echoes of Red October in Galway 2017

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As we approach the centenary of the 1917 October Revolution in Russia, Insider has been thinking about the impact this event continues to have on politics and society today. It is especially relevant in the context of today’s polarisation of politics, so perhaps it’s a fitting date on which to paraphrase Karl Marx: “A spectre is haunting the world: the spectre of October."

Lessons from ‘an old schoolmaster’

Week III

Former councillor seeks opinions on plans to elect ten TDs on brief to protect Rural Ireland

A former Connemara councillor is asking for opinions after he expressed a hope that a group of rural TDs could hold the balance of power and influence policy geared towards developing the regions.

Galway activist retracing grandmother’s 1917 tour of United States in documentary film

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A Galway feminist and activist is commemorating the centenary of her famous grandmother’s US tour for Irish independence with her own speaking tour this autumn.

A history of Reek Sunday

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In 1432, Pope Eugene IV issued a document that lay in obscurity deep within the Vatican vaults for centuries. When the doors of the archives and library of the Holy See were thrown open during the papacy of Pope Leo XIII (1878-1903), the British government sent a team of historians to transcribe everything they could find relating to Ireland. As a result of that investigative trawl, the well-known historian William Henry Grattan Flood presented Dr John Healy, Archbishop of Tuam, with a medieval document that detailed Rome’s official 15th century stance regarding the Croagh Patrick pilgrimage. The document, dated 27 September 1432, states, “Pope Eugene IV grants to the Archbishop of Tuam [at the time Seán Mac Feorais, aka John de Bermingham] an indulgence of two years and two quarantines [one quarantine was a penance of 40 days], on the usual conditions, for those penitents who visit and give alms toward the repair of the fabric of the chapel of St Patrick on the mountain which is called Croagh Patrick: this indulgence to be gained on the Sunday preceding the Feast of St Peter’s Chains [August 1]: because on that day a great multitude resorts thither to venerate St Patrick in the said chapel.” Archbishop Healy revived the old tradition of pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick and built the present church on its summit in 1905. But the history of the pilgrimage goes back further than the 1400s.

The Protestant enclave of Inishbiggle

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In the 1650s, Catholics were uprooted from their productive, arable, lands in several Irish counties by Oliver Cromwell’s Protestant army and forced at musket point to desolate, barren, Connacht. Their confiscated lands, the better holdings in Ireland, were distributed to Protestant settlers, Cromwell’s army as pay, and carved up to pay debts. Maps of Ireland, pre and post Cromwell, detailing the regression of the predominantly Catholic associated Irish language and customs point to a culture that was deliberately and officially forced to areas thought of as being so inhospitable they would not survive. County Mayo was included among these religious and cultural ghettoes. The living standards of the banished Catholics fell dangerously low and remained so for centuries. Christian duty led some within the Protestant clergy to later establish evangelical missions in the wild Irish west to give relief to the descendants of those very same Catholics. Salvation and, dishonourably, food were offered through conversion to Protestantism. Whereas 17th century Protestants believed it was God's will that godless Catholics be sent to suffer and perhaps perish in Mayo, 19th century Protestants believed it was His will that these (still godless) Catholics be reclaimed so that they might be saved. The Rev Edward Nangle's Achill Island Mission set out to do just that in 1831.

Politicians - to much drift, too little grasp of the real issues

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The first six months of 2017 have been hectic to say the least - a change of taoiseach, arguments which have severely tested the stability of the government and brought us to the brink of a general election more than once, a UK general election, and the collapse of the Stormont Assembly.

 

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