Eamonn Corbett and 1916

GALWAY ADVERTISER, April 24, 2014

Eamonn Corbett came from Kileeneenbeg near Clarinbridge. He was associated with the Volunteer movement in County Galway from 1914 onwards. After the Redmondite split he gave valuable assistance in organising the Volunteers throughout the county, and in 1915 he was assisting Liam Mellows while training the various companies in the Brigade area.

In April 1916, he was Brigade Adjutant to Larry Lardner and played an important role in the preparations for Easter Week. In the week before, he responded to a communication from Pádraic Pearse and went to St Enda’s in Dublin to receive instructions for the Brigade. He returned on the Tuesday night with the word for the rebellion, and for the rest of the week was active in the preparations. On Easter Sunday he was mobilised with his company when the countermanding order came.

Constitution Day, April 18, 1949

GALWAY ADVERTISER, April 17, 2014

On that day 65 years ago, the Government declared Ireland to be a Republic. This did not help Anglo-Irish relations at the time, and it also upset deValera and his Fianna Fáil colleagues, but it was the cause of public celebrations around the country.

The day was Easter Monday and in Galway thousands of people from the city and the surrounding hinterland turned out to join in the nationwide rejoicing of the birth of the Republic of Ireland.

Market Street, one hundred years ago

GALWAY ADVERTISER, April 10, 2014

The title of this photograph is ‘Old Building, Market Street’ and it was taken about 100 years ago. The building in the foreground was at one time occupied by the Augustinian nuns who were based in Galway (where the Mechanics is today in Middle Street) before 1651. The last Augustinian nun to die in Ireland is buried in Forthill. These sisters formed part of the same Augustinian Order as the friars, as do their contemplative successors today in countries like Spain and Italy. Continuing persecutions and other historical pressures saw to the end of these nuns in Ireland, though some lingered on in Galway up to the middle of the 19th century.

Notice the dressed stone windows on the facade.

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