Galway and the Great War 1914-1918

Thu, Nov 08, 2018

On August 4 1914, Lt Col Henry Jourdain, Commander of the Connaught Rangers in Renmore Barracks, Galway, received mobilisation orders which changed the lives of thousands of families throughout the city and county. Urgent appeals for recruits were sent out. Hundreds of young men began arriving from all over Connacht. Temporary military camps were set up outside the barracks to cater for the recruits.

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The Salthill Citizens’ Association, c1946

Thu, Nov 01, 2018

The first concerted move to improve Salthill (that I know of) was in 1882 when funds were collected locally and the Salthill Improvement Company was set up to improve the resort. The prevention of pollution was a priority. The company had its ups and downs and eventually died off. The first meeting of the Galway Urban District Council in 1925 had a deputation from Salthill who listed proposed improvements, In the 1930s a Salthill Development Committee was set up.

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Galway City Museum to mark the end of WWI

Thu, Oct 25, 2018

On Saturday November 10, the eve of the centenary of the armistice which ended WWI, Galway City Museum will host a special lecture on The Great War of 1914 to 1918.

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The Columban Hall

Thu, Oct 25, 2018

The Columban Hall is described as a bizarre high-Victorian building with a gabled facade of opus incertum with a small porch, polychrome arches to the windows, a star shaped west window, and a curious chunky top-knot. It was originally built as a Congregational Church, designed by Raffles Brown and completed in 1863. Our photograph (courtesy of the National Library) was taken just a few years later.

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Christabel Pankhurst in Galway

Wed, Oct 17, 2018

Our image this week is of a newspaper advertisement for an extraordinary meeting that took place in the Town Hall 100 years ago today.

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OBITUARY - The death of Monivea’s Msgr. James J. Loughnane PA. VF. in Los Angeles.

Mon, Oct 15, 2018

Monivea native Monsignor James J. Loughnane Protonotary Apostolic, Vicar Forane & pastor of St. Denis in Diamond Bar, passed away at the age of 81 at St. Jude Hospital in Fullerton on Monday evening the 17th of September following complications post emergency surgery.

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Waterside, c1885

Thu, Oct 11, 2018

Some 100 years before this photograph was taken, most of the area we are looking at would have been under water, the river covered much of what is Woodquay today. Most of the people who lived in the area would have been small farmers or fishermen, their houses (outside the city walls) made of blocks of stone, often with moss stuffed into the crevices and a roof covered partly with straw, partly with turf. The river provided a rich source of food, though in the city, the fishery, from the Salmon Weir to the sea, was privately owned.

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Patrick O’Brien - volunteer

Thu, Oct 04, 2018

Patrick O’Brien was born in Waterdale, Claregalway in 1895. He joined the volunteers in 1914 and did drilling and training in arms for active operations.

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New Docks Road, c1900

Thu, Sep 27, 2018

This photograph was taken from the far side of the docks c1900 and shows New Docks Road in the distance and Bonham Quay on the right.

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Hill’s of Lower Dominick Street

Wed, Sep 19, 2018

This photograph, dated 1905, was part of an advertisement for Hill & Co Cycle Makers and for Hill’s Dublin Studio, a photographic gallery. Both of these were located in this building in Lower Dominick Street. You have to hand it to Edmund Hill, he was a dab hand at publicity, and advertised extensively.

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Coláiste Éinde, ninety years

Thu, Sep 13, 2018

Coláiste Éinde was founded very shortly after the State itself was founded. The aim was to educate boys through the medium of Irish so that they would go on to St Patrick’s teacher training college, get secure employment for life, and in turn, teach a new generation of boys through Irish. It started life in Furbo House, an old house belonging to the Blake family. A domestic problem arose within the family who owned the house, so the school’s stay there was brief and they had to leave at Christmas 1930. The college was transferred to Talbot House in Talbot Street, Dublin, the following month.

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Taylor’s Hill school, one hundred and sixty years

Thu, Sep 06, 2018

One hundred and sixty years ago on Saturday, September 8, 1858, the Dominican sisters opened their school on Taylor’s Hill. Three years before that, they had taken over a house there known as Seaview (sometimes known as Mount Eaton), which belonged to the Sloper family; a simple country house with eight rooms, a medley of kitchen premises to the rear, stables behind the house, and with it, five acres of land.

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Taylor’s Hill school, one hundred and sixty years

Wed, Sep 05, 2018

One hundred and sixty years ago on Saturday, September 8, 1858, the Dominican sisters opened their school on Taylor’s Hill. Three years before that, they had taken over a house there known as Seaview (sometimes known as Mount Eaton), which belonged to the Sloper family; a simple country house with eight rooms, a medley of kitchen premises to the rear, stables behind the house, and with it, five acres of land.

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Lady Mary Heath in ‘The Swamp’

Thu, Aug 30, 2018

Lady Mary Heath was a famous pioneering pilot. She was born in Knockaderry near Newcastle West, Co Limerick, in 1896. She was an accomplished sportswoman who helped introduce women’s track events to the Olympics. The 1920s was an era when the world seemed to have gone aviation mad, thanks to the exploits of Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart. In 1927, Lady Mary became the first woman to hold a commercial licence in Britain, the first woman to parachute out of an aircraft, and the first pilot to fly a small open-cockpit plane from Cape Town to London. She set records for altitude in a small plane. For much of the 1920s she was one of the best known women in the world, brave, determined, and accomplished.

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An Taibhdhearc, ninety years a’growing

Thu, Aug 23, 2018

On December 3, 1927, a group of people met with the idea of setting up an Irish language theatre in Galway. The committee elected were Dr Séamus Ó Beirn, president; Seán Mac Giollarnáith, treasurer; Liam Ó Briain and Séamus Luibhéid, secretaries; An tAthair Pádraic Ó hEidhin, Liam Ó Buachalla, Síle Ní Chinnéide, Tomás Ó Raghallaigh, Mícheál Ó Droighneáin, Donal Ó Riordáin, and Tomás Ó Máille.

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The art of hurling

Thu, Aug 16, 2018

In the year 1527, it was decreed in one of the Galway Statutes that “At no time to use ne occupy ye hurling of ye little balle with the hookie sticks or staves, nor use no hand balle to play without the walls, but only the great foot balle”. It seems the authorities of the day were trying to limit the playing of hurling, but they might as well have tried to hold back the tide.

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The Abbey Church

Thu, Aug 09, 2018

In the year 1296, Uilliam Liath De Burgo started to build a monastery for the Franciscans on a site roughly where the Courthouse is today. It became known as “St Francis’ Abbey on the island of Saint Stephen on the north side of the town”. The island was formed by the river on the west side, and by a branch of the river running through what is Woodquay and Mary Street today, to join the main stream above O’Brien’s Bridge. A second and smaller island lay between St Stephen’s and the town wall, so in order to communicate with the town, two bridges were necessary, one at the junction of Mary Street and Abbeygate Street and the other at the Little Gate.

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The Abbey Church

Wed, Aug 08, 2018

In the year 1296, Uilliam Liath De Burgo started to build a monastery for the Franciscans on a site roughly where the Courthouse is today. It became known as “St Francis’ Abbey on the island of Saint Stephen on the north side of the town”. The island was formed by the river on the west side, and by a branch of the river running through what is Woodquay and Mary Street today, to join the main stream above O’Brien’s Bridge. A second and smaller island lay between St Stephen’s and the town wall, so in order to communicate with the town, two bridges were necessary, one at the junction of Mary Street and Abbeygate Street and the other at the Little Gate.

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Seapoint Corner about one hundred and fifty years ago

Thu, Aug 02, 2018

This was Seapoint Corner c1865. The buildings we see, running from the left, are Prospect Lodge; Corrig View; Elm View; Prairie House with the balcony, which was built 1855-1861 by Colman O’Donohoe who had obviously spent some time in America; Beachmount; Villa Marina, which had the sign Michael Horan, Grocer over the door; Sunnyside Lodge; Seapoint House; then a gap which led into Seapoint Terrace; and finally, the thatched building which was George Fallon’s Baths. The sign on his gable read Hot Baths and Bathing, No Refunds and his family operated the baths business at least from 1855 to 1894

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Taylor’s Bar

Thu, Jul 26, 2018

This late 19th century building in Upper Dominick Street was originally a grocery and a pub owned by a family of O’Connells. They used to stable horses out the back. When they sold it, they moved to Dublin where one of them was unfortunately murdered. The pub was taken over by a Mr Cosgrave.

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E-paper

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